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work hard. PLAY HARD. 



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Phi Psi Cli 

Yearbook 

2009-2010 

Volume 95 



Elon University 
Elon, NC 27244 
336.278.7248 
www.elon.edu 




Academics Sports Seniors News Index 



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efining moments in the history of any 
university are not everyday events. 
When they do take place, they are very 
often the end resiih of many ideas and hard work 
contributed by countless people. As I look back 
on 2009-2010, my hope is that the past 12 months 
will be remembered not for one or two moments 
but as an overall defining year for our campus. 

The Phi Beta Kappa Society, the nation's 
oldest and most prestigious academic society, 
established a new chapter here. Lindner 
Hall, the centerpiece of the Academic Village 
and Elon's greenest building to date, opened 
for the fall semester. Pamela M. Kiser was 
named the fourth Distinguished University 
Professor, and Catherine McNeela was 
named the William S. Long Professor. 

Our achievements were likewise found on the 
playing field. The football team made history 
when it competed in its first NCAA Football 
Championship Series playoff" game. Phoenix 
cross country teams hosted the inaugural Elon 
Invitational meet in September before holding 
the Southern Conference championship meet 
the following month. We also opened the 
W. Cecil Worsley III Golf Training Center, a 
state-of-the-art facility on South Campus. 

Several public figures visited campus, including 
Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Nicholas 
Kristof, author Khaled Hosseini, retired U.S. 
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, 
former presidential press secretary Dee Dee 
Myers and NPR reporter Nina Totenberg. 
Their insights gave us a deeper understanding 
and appreciation of the challenges and 
opportunities we can find in the wider world. 

Most important, this was a year when Elon 
took an important step in its growth. The 
board of trustees approved our new strategic 
plan, "The Elon Commitment," which will 



serve as a compass for how we shape the 
campus in the next 10 years. The plan calls for 
an unprecedented commitment to diversity 
and global engagement, greater support for 
our world-class faculty and staff", increasing 
academic excellence and creating innovative 
new programs, expanding efforts to engage and 
support alumni, advancing Phoenix athletics and 
a new campus master plan that will transform 
the residential experience and add critically 
needed academic and community facilities. 

All of these goals will shape the next generation 
of Elon students. I believe, and I hope you agree, 
that this plan will further cement the reputation 
of our cherished university not just in our own 
country but on the international stage as well. 

As you open your Phi Psi Cli in the decades 
ahead, pause for a moment to remember your 
Elon experiences. Maybe that memory is of 
a study abroad program where you learned 
something new about another culture. Perhaps 
a friendship grew from conducting research 
with a caring faculty mentor. Your unique 
reflection may be of a service-learning program 
that helped you define your life's passion. 

Tliough change will soon come to this 

campus with new faces and new buildings, I ] 

hope you reaffirm the core of what it means 
to be a member of the university family. Stay 
connected to Elon. Keep in touch with your , 
favorite professors and your closest college 
friends and reflect often on the unique privilege 
you have had to attend this institution. 

Stand up for those who lack a voice. Use . 

what you have learned to serve as an example 
of what it means to be a global citizen. And 
never stop shaping your community with the 
values we cherish, the values that make Elon 
University a force for change in the world. 



PRESIDENT LEO M. LAMBERT 



Welcome to 



5,666 

Total enrollment for graduate 
and undergraduate students 



$33,725 

Tuition, fees, room & board 



1842 

The average SAT score for 
incoming freshmen 




Average class size 



Number of states represented 
by Elon students 




ARD, PLAY HARD 





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President Leo Lambert marks 

I ye^Pif^ of change 

4 completed structures: 

McMichael Science Building 
Carol Grotnes Belk Library 
Rhodes Stadium 
Oaks residence hall connplex 

1 3 new structures: 

BelkTrack and White Field 
Ernest A. Koury Sn Business Center 
Ellington Health Center 
Colonnades Dining Hall 
The School of Comnnunications 
Colonnades residence halls 
The six-building Academic Village 
Danieley Center Commons 

3 new initiatives: 

Elon Academy 
EverElon campaign 
Sustainability Master Plan 

4 remodeling projects: 

Octagon adds Freshens and Pan Geos 
The Zone becomes Irazu Coffee 
Elon buys Lighthouse Tavern 
Cantina, Brown & Co., Town Table 

3 sustainable modes of 
transportation: 

BioBuses 
Zip Cars 
Railroad tunnel 

2 new graduate programs: 

Elon Law School 

Interactive Media master's degree 





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Without the success of its students, Elon 
would be but a shadow of what it is 
today. The university gives back to the students 
by providing them with evocative moments 
that shape them during their time at Elon. 
Spanning from the moment students set foot 
on campus as they move in for the first time 
to the traditional acquirement of the sapling 
after graduation, Elon helps students make 
memories from an unforgettable journey. _ 

The onset of every new year brings 
old traditions. Freshmen move in during 
Orientation Weekend, College Coffee and 
College Chapel start their weekly assemblies 
and the academic buildings once again 
become flooded with students. Once routines 
have been established, students can be 
found in the gym, at movies on the lawn 
and attending campus-wide events like the 
Holiday Luminaries. ELONTHON and Elon 
Volunteers offer students opportunities to show 
their philanthropic sides, while Elons media 
organizations, such as the Pendulum, WSOE 
and ESTV provide an outlet for reporting news 
and voicing opinions. Still yet, some students 
choose to be involved in Greek Life, ROTC and 
on- and off-campus jobs. 

Regardless of one's interests, any student 
can find a home in Elon that will make them 
dread the day they have to leave the community 
affectionately known as "the bubble." 



LAUREN NEEDELL / LIFE SECTION EDITOR 




"Move-in day was CRAZY! All the new faces were 
overwhelming!" 



Sam Kahane, Freshman 



I 



On the move 




On Friday, August 28, more than 100 members of the 
orientation team assembled at 6:15 a.m. to begin the exciting 
process of moving in the freshman class of 2013. 
New students began arriving shortly thereafter, and before long, 
sheets were spread over bunks, televisions installed and futons 
assembled. Students met their roommates for the first time as well as 
future friends that will remain with them for the next four years and 
beyond. 

A team of enthusiastic upperclassmen greeted each new student 
and helped carry box after box up the relentless stairs. 

"I really enjoyed moving in the freshmen and making their first 
day at Elon a pleasant experience," said Daniel DiLaura, an orientation 
leader. 

Soon the move-in process came to a close as new students headed 
off^to their first orientation session. 

Freshman Sam Kahane sums up the day with his account. 
"Move-in day was CRAZY!" he said. "All the new faces were 
overwhelming! 

LAUREN NEEDELL / LIFE SECTION EDITOR 



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Emily Glaze stepped on the campus as an 
official Elon student for the first time. She was 
overwhelmed by the emotions she was feeling: 
nervousness, excitement, trepidation and optimism. 
She was finally where she was meant to be. 

After watching sL\ enthusiastic orientation leaders 
and 0-Team members move in her luggage, she, 
along with the 1,300 other freshmen that moved in 
on .\ugust 28, 2009, hurriedly unpacked and began 
settling into a new life. "Do you think I'm going to fall 
off my bed?" she asked her mom as she stared at her 
lofted bed. Despite her sleeping arrangement anxieties, 
she could not wait to spend her first night. 

That night, Emily, along with the other residents 
in her building in Danieley, trekked through the rain 
to present their phoenix rendition at Catch the Fire. 
This group bonding activit)' was the reason that one 
of her building mates ended up covered in tape and 
construction paper. This event was a great chance to 
meet some of the other residents of Danieley and get 
to know the area. That night she went home to a suite 
of the girls she had just met that day and knew she was 
going to have a great year. 

The next day was New Student Convocation, where 
EmUy sat under the oaks and listened to President Leo 
Lambert's speech and realized just how luck)' she was 
to be at Elon Universit)-. As she walked back to meet 
with her parents, she was handed the famous acorn - a 
symbol of the growth that is going to transpire during 
the ne.xt four years. That afternoon she attended the 
Farewell Picnic with her family by the lake. The fact 
that she was going to be living alone slowly began to 
set in. It was a bittersweet farewell as she said goodb)-e 
to her family. 

Emily's first collegiate weekend was a whirhvind 
of activities - new people, new places and new 
experiences. "Elon really makes a freshman feel at 
home right from the start," she said. As the Ne\v 
Student Orientation came to a close, freshmen all over 
campus eagerly awaited the new school year. 

JESSICA SCHOENHOLTZ / STAFF WRITER 



FROM LEFT: Freshmen receive acorns at 
convocation to carry through their journey 
at Elon, and In four years, they will receive 
oal< saplings to symbolize their growth. 
Junior orientation leader Alexandra Lawrence 
scoops cotton candy for new students at 
the Phoenix Frenzy, one of their orientation 
activities. Photos by Lindsay Fendt. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 




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Whether it is stressing over hall bathrooms or 
meeting a roommate for the first time, the 
adjustment of living on campus is new and 
unfamiliar for most college freshmen. That is where Residence 
Life comes in. Residence Life is the central information hub for 
all 2,900 students that live on Elon's campus. 

The housing process begins for enrolled students in February 
or March of each year and for new students it starts during the 
summer. The process has gone digital, and housing selection 
is now online. There are different phases to the process, and 
students can either form groups to choose who they live with or 
decide to be placed with random roommates. 

RAs, or resident assistants, live on every hall of on-campus 
dorms and apartments and help students adjust to their new 
home-away-from-home. Through floor meetings, bulletin 
boards and hall outings, RAs encourage students to get involved 
in their residence area. It is an RA's job to help Elon students 
love where they live. 

RACHEL BERTONE / STAFF WRITER 




Senior Stephanie Allen lives in Oaks F and 
has a single bedroom, two full baths and a 
kitchen. The Oaks Apartments are part of the 
university's efforts to provide more luxurious 
dorms to keep upperclassmen living on campus. 
Photos by Justine Schulerud. 



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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: 

The Intercultural Relations Club 

seeks to gain new members 

for its banquets and activities. 

Many of the organizations at the 

fair used unique strategies, like 

food and science experiements, 

to attract potential members 

to their tables. Elon Club Dance 

wowed prospective members with 

their dance moves. Members of 

the Triathlon Club demonstrate 

the proper attire and equipment 

for their group activity. The ESTV 

crew shows prospective members 

clips from their variety TV shows, 

including "WinStuff!" and "Road 

Trip." Photos by Randy Piland. 









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Find your niche 



On Friday, Sept. 11, representatives from Elon's 150+ organizations set up 
tables bordering Young Commons between Belk Library and Alumni Gym to 
recruit new members during the school's annual Organization Fair. This is an 
excellent opportunity for new and returning students alike to become more involved 
on campus. Members from each organization answered questions and encouraged 
students to write their names and e-mail addresses on the group's coveted member 
signup sheet. 

Club sports, media groups, religious organizations, foreign language clubs, Greek 
Life, Resident Student Association (RSA) and Student Union Board (SUB) were 
among those represented. Each organization adorned its table with posters and other 
paraphernalia. Many had free goodies to hand out in an attempt to attract more 
passersby. SPARKS (Students Promoting Awareness, Responsibility and Success) gave 
away color-changing cups. Twisted Measure sang a few a capella arrangements. Physics 
Club member Daniel DiLuzio, a senior, laid across a bed of nails. "It was therapeutic," 
he nonchalantly explained later. 

The incredible heat did not keep students away from this year's Organization 
Fair. Although the fair was well represented and well attended, it was up to each 
organization to retain the new members from their signup sheet for the rest of the year. 

LAUREN NEEDELL/ LIFE SECTION EDITOR 






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2005-2006 

Year the organization began 



If 



Number of dues-paying members 



Number of dance styles practiced 



Phoenix Cash 

Meal Plans 

Food Dollars 



Meal Dollars 



E Ion's on-campus dining has seen many transformations during this school year. 
Perhaps the biggest has been the change in meal plans. The much-loved $2.50 
equivalence was eliminated due to its poor value. In its wake, students are now 
able to add food dollars to their Phoenix Cards. Prices increased, but representatives 
claim that it is due to an increase in food and maintenance costs. 

Many dining locations have gone through renovations this year, as well. Harden 
and Acorn received face-lifts before the start of the school year, and The Zone was 
transformed into Irazu Coffee. In the beginning of February, all the dining places 
located in McEwen were closed for two weeks to repair multiple plumbing problems, 
including the drainage lines from the dishwashing and the floor drains on the second 
floor of the building. 

Another big change during the school year has been the closing of Brown & 
Company. Stemming from the university's strategic plan, the school sold it to a local 
restaurant owner in an effort to attract more privately-owned businesses to the areas 
surrounding the campus. However, the staples of the restaurant, such as the artichoke 
dip, Wild Bill's Pasta and the Killer Cookie, have been moved to 1889 Grill Room. 



LAUREN NEEDELL / LIFE SECTION EDITOR 




Where do you 
eat on campus? 




Pan Geos 



Freshens 



Java City 

Irazu , 



1889 Grill Room 



o Harden <l 

' Town Table << 

U Varsity McEwen 




CLOCKWISE FROM TOP 
LEFT: Students enjoy the 
outdoor buffet during 
the Octagon Fiesta. Each 
dining hall on campus offers 
students their favorite 
options for breakfast 
cereal In easy dispensing 
containers. This group of 
students catch up and relax 
during the week of spring 
semester midterms for 
dinner at the Colonnades 
dining hall. Other students, 
like the ones pictured to the 
left, meet frequently to dine 
with their friends. Photos by 
Alex Trice and Kate Austin. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 1 9 




CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Students 

enjoy hot chocolate and coffee during 

the early morning tradition in February. 

Rev. Richard McBride motivates and 

inspires students as part of College 

Chapel's "Defining Moments" program. 

College Coffee is the perfect time for 

students to network and socialize with 

faculty and their peers. Students brave 

the cold and overcast weather for 

fellowship and breakfast. Despite its 

early 9:40 a.m. time, students flock to 

College Coffee before attending class. 

During College Coffee, students may 

enjoy such treats as bananas, bagels 

or even cupcakes. Photos courtesy 

of The Pendulum and Kate Austin. 




Elon Traditions 

College Coffee and College Chapel 




College Coffee is an Klon tradition that occurs every Tuesday from 
9:40 a.m. to 10:20 a.m. It is a chance to enjoy some fresh air, eat 
some donuts and spend time with friends and professors. 

The time that College Coffee runs is convenient for everybody 
because there are no classes in that 40-minute span. It gives students, 
faculty and staff a time to relax in a stress-free environment while they 
converse among one another The tradition is held at the Academic 
Village Plaza, and when the weather is the perfect temperature, 
masses of Elon's community will congregate to delight in not only the 
company and food but the weather as well. 

College Coffee is one of Elon's oldest and most respected traditions, 
and with the amount of students and faculty who experience it weekly, 
it is one of the most enjoyable as well. 

AVERY LUCAS / STAFF WRITER 








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Originally formed as a cover band in Elon, The 
Anonymous Band (formerly Anonymous) has 
entertained students for the past five years, but isn't 
stopping there. Playing with bands such as Sister Hazel and 
Perpetual Groove, The Anonymous Band is seeing success few 
bands ever taste. 

With a live show of foot-stomping original jams intertwined 
with wonderfully chosen covers. The Anonymous Band forces 
crowds to take part in the band's musical parties. Audiences can 
expect to hear the sounds of everything from The Grateful Dead 
to The Talking Heads, in addition to a slew of new and exciting 
tunes. 

The release of their first EP, The Handout, and a recent 
rotation of band members, has propelled the band's popularity 
to a new level. Scheduling shows from Washington, D.C., to its 
roots in the Elon and Greensboro area. The Anonymous Band's 
transformation from an outstanding cover band to a unique 
high-energ)' band has taken place. 

The Anonymous Band offers something for everyone, 
regardless of musical taste. The band's visits to its origin provide 
Elon students an opportunit)' to see the group as it continues to 
gain popularitv'. 

WILSON OWENS / CONTRIBUTOR 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The Anonymous Band performs 
at Lighthouse Tavern on a Friday night in September. Juniors 
Jacob Danieiey and Sam Lewis, members of The Major, tune 
up before their performance. Senior Kevin Johnson of played 
a guest performance during D-Tov^n Funk Down's set. Dave 
Barnes performs at Lighthouse as a part of SUB's Friday night 
SUBIive program. Photos by Lauren Ramsdell, Lindsay Fendt 
and Daniel Koch. 



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For many students on Elon's campus, staying active and fit 
is a top priority. Campus Recreation offers a wide range of 
facilities and activities for students to take advantage of, in 
order to fight off the freshman 15. From treadmills and elliptical 
machines to Group-X classes and rock climbing trips with Elon 
Outdoors, there is always something new from Campus Rec that 
students can use to stay in shape. 

Campus Rec is also a great place for student employees. Anna 
Hulett, a junior who has been a lifeguard at the pool for three years, 
said she loves the fle.xibility of working at Campus Rec and being 
involved in some of the programs it puts on throughout the year 
This year, the aquatics department put on Pumpkins at the Pool in 
the Fall. This program was for children in the community to focus 
on water safety and fun pool activities. 

Campus Rec is always looking for new and innovative ways 
to keep Elon active. Some annual events that are popular among 
students include the Turkey Trot, Sportsfest, Bench Press 
Competition, Pumpkins at the Pool and USWIM. 

RACHEL BERTONE / STAFF WRITER 



Campus Rec Divisions: 



Aquatics 
Club Sports 
Driving Range 
Elon Outdoors 
Facilities 
Fitness 
Group-X 
Intramurals 
Special Programs 




CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A Campus Rec employee 
poses with the turkey for the annual Turkey Trot. Students 
give it their all during the trot. This Campus Rec employee 
enjoys being the referee. Laura Brentnup, winner of the 
female student division, receives her trophy. These Campus 
Rec employees show how fun it is to exercise. Photos 
courtesy of Lindsay Molin. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 







LEFT TO RIGHT: Senior 
wide receiver Terrell 
Hudgins and junior 
quarterback Scott 
Riddle relax off the field. 
Homecoming queen and 
king, seniors Kate Hopkins 
and Clay Winklevoss, pose 
after being crowned. In the 
on-and-off rain, the all- 
female cheerleading squad 
pumps up the crowd in 
ponchos. 




Celebrating 

^SPIRT 



his year's Homecoming football game against Chattanooga occurred 
on October 24, 2009. Klon triumphed over Chattanooga with a final 
score of 45 to 10. The game took place at 1:30 p.m. and the Phoenix 

played a great game through the constant off-and-on rain. 

Elon received the kick to start the game. The team did everything they 

could to ensure a win and play a great game for the Homecoming crowd. 

Students and returning alumni all came together to support the Phoenix 

and enjoy the game. 

The team came into the game with a 5-1 record. Winning the 

Homecoming game was crucial for school spirit and morale. The PhoenLx 

proudly showed returning alumni a victory. 



AVERY LUCAS / STAFF WRITER 



LEFT: A crowd of fraternity brothers, sorority sisters, fans and 
alumni cheer for their favorite homecoming court couples. 
Photos by David Wells. 

BELOW: Chattanooga's freshman defensive end Joshua Williams 
sacks Elon junior quarterback Scott Riddle and sophomore 
ineman Rodney Austin as senior wide receiver Terrell Hudgins 
looks on. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 






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The annual Holiday Celebration 
with Luminaries event was 
another success the evening of 
Thursday. Dec. 3 as hundreds of Elon 
students and community members 
celebrated the start of the holiday 
season. The c\'ent-goers enjoyed hot 
chocolate, apple cider, songs. lights 
and Santa as the university's campus 
w'as lit up during a singing of "Deck 
the Halls" in Scott Plaza. Always a 
highlight. Santa and Mrs. Claus made 
an appearance, and visitors could 
take a ride on Eton's miniature train. 



RACHEL CIERI / DESIGN EDITOR 




The long-standing luminaries tradition 
leaves the area between Alamance and 
Moseley Center covered In thousands of 
lights, a spectacle attended by hundreds of 
students, faculty and community members. 







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BOTTOM, FROM LEFT: 
The Luminaries 
celebration was held 
in front of Alamance, 
the focal point of 
the decorations. The 
brick walkways on 
the main quad were 
lined with candles. 
Carolers in traditional 
costume were one of 
the higlights of the 
celebration. Photos by 
Stuart Jones and David 
Wells. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



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At $33,725 a year, attending Elon University cannot be called 
inexpensive, especially with the state of the economy right now. 
Elon students hold jobs on and off campus in order to help pay for 
tuition, in addition to budgeting their money carefully. 

Some students found off-campus jobs, like seniors Lindsay Perdue and 
Cameron Williamson, who worked on the wait staff of Red Robin in the 
nearby Alamance Crossing shopping center. 

With job opportunities all across campus, students who wanted a job 
could find something that interested them, from working for Campus 
Recreation to being a tour guide for prospective students. 

Working about 18 hours a week, junior Lindsay Fendt worked in the 
main office in the School of Communications to help pay for her tuition. 
Although the money was helpful, getting schoolwork done was a challenge. 

"I work from 10 until 5 on Tuesdays and Thursdays and those are the 
worst because I don't have time to do anything else during the day," Lindsay 
said. Luckily, balancing her schedule was not too overwhelming. "I think 
that everyone feels like they don't have enough time to get done what they 
want to. I don't think I have a much harder time than anyone else." 

Elon students have learned to budget their time and money. "Make 
your own food, clip coupons hardcore and take the BioBus to save money," 
Lindsay recommended. 

BLAIR MENZEL / STAFF WRITER 






LEFT: Senior Cameron Williamson earns his spending money with 
a part-time job at Red Robin. Senior LIndsey Perdue, a part-time 
waitress and full-time student, rushes to bring food to her table. 
ABOVE: Several Elon students work together on Red Robin's wait 
staff. Part of Cameron's job Is mixing Iced tea for customers. Photos 
by Kate Austin. 




800 



Number of students who 
have a job on campus 



0-20 



Average number of hours 
of work per week 



$ 1 ,000 - $2,500 

The average amount of 
money a student earns 



in a year 



$7.25 

Minimum wage for an 
on-campus job 



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I ach year, Elon's Student Union 
Board holds a spring concert 

'featuring either one popular, 

mainstream band or two up-and-com 
bands. Vie concert, held in Alumni 
Gym, attracts many Hlon students, as 
well as visitors who hear about the she 
TiTis year's concert featured two popul 
bands, Tlnird Hye Bhnd and Sh\va\'7.e. 
The doors opened at 7 p.m., and th( 
line outside Alumni (iym continued I 
be out the doors until about 9 p.m. W 



the building, the gym was crowded, witi 
hundreds of people standing in front 
of the stage and the seats on the second 
floor. 



LEFT: Rapper Schwayze, who is best 
known for his single "Corona and Lime," 
opened the show. 

TOP RIGHT: Rock group Third Eye Blind 
followed Schwayze as the main act. 



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Ihc show kicked oH'around 8 p.m. 
with an up-and-coming artist performing 
to gel ihe crowd pumped up for the (wo 



hllle less than an hour of the initial band 
. playing, the crowd anxiou.siy wailed for 

Schway/.e to begin playing. Schwayze 
• followed up with a great performance, 
; gelling tile crowd hyped up and excited. 
Alter their hour of playing lime, the .set 
up for I hird Iac Blind came on, and they 
finished the concert by playing new songs 
and old favorites. Ihe concert let out 
before midnight, and with the smiles on 
everyone's laces, it was a pleasant niuhl 



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AVERY LUCAS / STAFF WRITER 



BOTTOM RIGHT: Lead singer Stephan 
Jenkins entertained the crowd with 
his singing, his guitar playing and his 
onstage antics. 



4 




The Student Union 
Board, led by senior 
Music Chair Anna 
Davis, planned this 
sold-out show. SUB 
arranged photo 
opportunities and 
Interviews for the 
student media, and 
they had the chance 
to work with the 
musicians directly. 
Photos by Brian 
Allenby and My 
Nyugen. 



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The event began with 
a little more than 200 
dancers. 



Dancers began to 
sign up in teams and 
participate in six- hour 
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2003 



2004 



2005 



2006 



"ELONTHON" 
became the 
event's official 
name. 



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This year's ELONTHON featured 
a "Kids can do it. We can help," 
theme and entertained dancers 
with guest speakers, contests 
and performances. Photos by 
Heather Cassano. 



~^he Elonthon dance marathon 
is one of Eton's most exciting 
- and rewarding events of 
the year. The annual charity event 
is a 24-hour marathon that gives 
all proceeds to Duke Children's 
Hospital, which is Elon's local 
Children's Miracle Network ho.spital. 
The event celebrated its seventh 
anniversary this year with the theme 
"Kids can do it. We can help." 

The planning for Elonthon begins 
before move-in day. The executive 
committee starts marketing the event 
when students arrive on campus, 
despite the fact that it takes place in 
the spring, llie committee embarks 
on a retreat during the summer to 
review the logistics of the event and 
decide on the theme for that year. 
Tlie committee, which is made up of 
a marketing team and an operations 
team, works hard the entire acacfemic 
year to make the event happen. 

Many children from Duke 
Children's Hospital and their families 
come to Elonthon to show their 
gratitude toward the students. A ■ 
hospital liaison helps the families 
get in contact with Elon. Many of 
these families speak at the marathon, 
sharing the stories of how Elonthon 
has affected their lives. Some of 
the children even showcase special 
talents like singing or dancing, 
families are always invited back the 
next year to show their support. 



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An Environmental Management System 
(EMS) is underway at Elon University, 
overseen by Science Laboratory 
Manager Paul Weller. The EMS program allows 
colleges to identify and rank environmental 
aspects in order to develop new goals and 
procedures. 

The EPA Colleges and Universities Sector 
Group Web site says that an EMS allows a 
college to "operate with greater efficiency and 
control, comply with the law, protect the health 
of their community and demonstrate their 
commitment to environmental sustainability 
and progress. " 

The EMS process is extensive, said Weller. 
Weller, who is leading the EMS, explained that 
it will be a year or more before the university's 
system is completed. 

The Elon EMS staff is currently identifying 
all environmental aspects found on campus. 
An aspect is defined by the International 
Organization of Standardization as, "an element 
of an organization's activities, products or 
services that can interact with the environment." 

All of Elon's departments are being audited 
to obtain all environmental aspects. To help 
speed the process along, student workers have 
been hired to assist the EMS staff during winter 
term." 

Our job is to talk to people from different 
departments on campus and find out what 
they use and dispose of," said Amy Simmonds, 
student worker. "What we're really trying to find 
out is what we take and what goes back into the 
environment." 

For each department, the EMS staff and 
student workers compile lists of resources that 
are used, waste produced and items recycled. 
The lists are then categorized into dift'erent 
environmental aspects such as water utilization, 
energy consumption and hazardous waste 
generation. 

Once all of Elon's aspects are collected, a 
few significant aspects will be chosen and used 
to determine which goals will be an annual 
priority. 

"This will reduce our consumption of 
resources like water and electricity or increase 
the amount of recyclable waste generated," said 
Cecilia Smith, student worker. "We're not sure 
yet which aspect we will focus on for our EMS, 
but those are just a few of the options that we 
might pursue for the yearlong plan." 

The stafl^and students workers believe that 
the EMS will also help the Elon community by 
educating them on the aspects that are most 
used and the steps that can be taken to limit 
them. 

"Hopefully this assessment will also make us 
all a little bit more environmentally aware and 
smarter about what we use and dispose of on 
campus," Amy said. 

KRISTI JACOBSEN / CONTRIBUTOR 



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New sights, sounds and tastes can be found in a short ride to downtown 
BurUngton. A new downtown and East Burlington BioBus route 
encourages students to go beyond the "Elon bubble" and discover the 
community and the areas surrounding Elon University. 

The one-hour bus loop stops at six locations throughout downtown and East 
Burlington, making volunteer sites accessible by foot. 

Patrick Harman, executive director of the Hayden-Harman foundation in 
Burlington, hopes the route will acclimate students to the community and the 
opportunities it offers. 

"The more students get out into the community and learn about it, the more 
engaged and comfortable they will be with Burlington," Patrick said. 

The route will help community members learn more about the benefits of 
public transportation. 

"The BioBus is an opportunity for the community to become acclimated 
to what a fixed route would be," Patrick said. "There hasn't been public 
transportation in Burlington since 1978. Therefore, some people have no 
knowledge of what a bus route is." 

Traveling on the BioBus route offers students the opportunity to go beyond the 
"Elon bubble" and sustain the university's bond with Burlington. 

According to Tammy Cobb, the assistant director for community partnerships 
in the Kernodle Center for Service Learning, during the past eight years, 
numerous community partner agencies have said they need consistent student 
volunteers at their organizations. 

"The new loop will better connect the students to our community and our 
community to campus, strengthening and creating new relationships and 
partnerships," Tammy said. 



MARYYOST / CONTRIBUTOR 




Senior Kayla Hicken gets ready to board the BioBus. 
Elon has multiple bus routes and shuttle stops on 
campus. Students across campus use the BloBus 
to get to class or to places beyond Elon's campus. 
These students happily take a ride on the BioBus. 
Photos courtesy of The Pendulum. 



Did you 

KKumn 

The BioBus gets eight miles to 
the gallon while serving students. 

Burning bio-diesel is less 
harnnful to the environment and 
reduces dependency on natural 
petroleum. 



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of an Elon Student: Savannah Swanner 



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Rounds End (weekends) 



6:00 a.m. 
6:30 a.m. 
7:30 a.m. 
8:00 a.m. 
1 2:00 p.m. 
12:45 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
3:00 p.m. 
4:45 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 
10:00 p.m. 
1 2:00 a.m. 
2:00 a.m. 



Go to the Gym 



Go to Class 




Organization Meetings 



Rounds End (week days 




CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Sophomore 
Savannah Swanner decorates and 
updates the bulletin board In her 
residence hall. The bulletin board 
serves the residents by reminding 
them of campus, and hall, activities. 
When an issue arises, it is Swanner's 
responsibility to alert her residents 
by making rounds and conducting 
work orders. Work orders involve 
e-mailing residents to alert them if 
there is a clogged toilet or mold in 
a particular room. Her rounds also 
consist of walking through Hook, 
Brannock, Barney, Carolina and 
Smith to make sure everyone is 
okay and doing what they should, 
in the winter months, Swanner 
hosts a cookie decorating program 
for the students in her hall. These 
activities allow all students in the 
hall to bond. During her free time, 
Swanner focuses intently on her 
school work. Swanner exemplifies 
the qualities of a true Elon University 
student: responsibility, dedication and 
prioritization. Photos by Blair Menzel. 




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FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: 

Sigma Chi brothers Nicl< 

West and Jal<e Scott bond on 

a retreat in the mountains. 

Kappa Alpha members Andy 

Kestermann, Walker Harris, 

Trevor Carter, and Taylor 

Lindsey celebrate Bid Day. 

The Kappa Sigma intramural 

flag football team celebrates 

its victory. This Pi Kappa 

Phi member performs in 

his fraternity's PUSH the 

Music charity concert. Photos 

courtesy of Rachel Zeilinger, 

Sarah Isaacson, Virginia Penn 

and Maggie Landy. 




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Coming in as a freshman, I 
had no idea where my college 
career would lead me. I looked 
for various clubs and organizations 
to join, but nothing seemed to take 
my appeal. It wasn't until I joined Pi 
Kappa Phi that I came to understand 
what being in a fraterniU- was all 
about. Since joining, the fraternity 
has enhanced both my academic 
and social experience through many 
different avenues, most specifically 
through Push America. 

Push America is our national 
philanthropy, and it is the only one 
to be solely owned and operated by a 
fraternity. The mission of Push is to 
build leaders of tomorrow by serving 
people with disabilities today. I have 
participated in many different Push 
programs, including a summer event 
that took place over six weeks. Many 
people stigmatize fraternities because 
they are only aware of the stereotypes 
that exist, but Pi Kappa Phi is living 
proof of an organization that goes 
beyond the stereot\'pe. 

Without question, joining a 
fraternit)' at Elon is one the most 
beneficial decisions I have made. It 
helps to build leadership, promote 
service, encourage responsibility and 
foster brotherhood. 

GEOFF HALL / CONTRIBUTOR 



LEFT: The members of Lambda Chi Alpha 
celebrate bid day with their sweetheart, 
Rachel Zeilinger. 




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TOP, FROM LEFT: 
Alpha Kappa Alpha 
sisters display the 
symbols of their -/, - 
sisterhood at the" 
Organizations Fair. 
Alpha Omicron Pi 
seniors celebrate their 
Greek Life spirit with 
a toga-themed crush 
party. Photos courtesy 
of The Pendulum arjd 
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Stories of 
Sisterhood 



The first sorority in America was founded 143 years 
ago in 1867. Although some aspects of being in 
a sororitA' have altered throughout the years, the 
sisterhood and friendship that grows out of a sorority has 
remained unchanged. 

Elon offers the opportunity for women to join one of 12 
different sororities on campus. Being a sorority member is an 
enriching experience for any woman involved. 

"All of my sisters are real; I don't have to try and impress 
any of them for their approval," said Jessica Dobyns, an Alpha 
Chi Omega sister. "I can call any one of my sisters any time I 
need to, whether it is for a shoulder to cry on or someone to 
shop with. I couldn't imagine a larger benefit than having 100 
sisters that love me." 

Friendship is a huge benefit to all ^vomen involved in 
Greek life, regardless of the sorority that an individual joins. 

"The biggest benefit of being a member of Sigma Kappa 
has been all of the friendships that have been formed and all 
of the great people that 1 have gotten to know since 1 have 
been involved," said Sarah Foushee, a Sigma Kappa sister. 

While every sororit)* sister would agree that being a part 
of Greek life is very time-consuming, each woman would 
undoubtedly express the inexplicable love and sisterhood 
that exists within their sorority. 

BLAIR MENZEL / STAFF WRITER 



BOTTOM, FROM LEFT: Members of Alpha Chi 
Omega tell new students about their sorority at the 
Organizations Fair. Delta Sigma Theta sisters show 
their spirit by sporting sorority-themed umbrellas. 
Sigma Kappa member Lauren Caldwell was named 
runner-up for Homecoming Queen. Representatives 
from each sorority make up the Panhellenic Council. 
Members of Sigma Sigma Sigma tailgate for the 
Homecoming game. 





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Cadet Matt Dinwiddle groans and rises as his alarm reverberates 
through his room at 4:30 a.m. His classmates remain fast asleep, 
not having to wake for hours. 

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, Matt showers and throws on his olive 
green, black and tan uniform. He reaches for his matching socks and boots. 
The Indiana native will meet the other junior cadets at Target and carpool 
30 minutes to North Carolina A&T University, the Elon ROTC's battalion 
headquarters, for assessment training. 

"For Tuesdays, for class, I guess it's a personal preference [to wear your 
uniform all day]," Matt said. "For a lot of us, we're going from 5 a.m. to 
whenever class is over. If you go and change. ..it's not really worth it for a 
lot of people, so we just prefer to stay in uniform all day. As long as it's not 
really hot or really cold, it [the uniform] is actually pretty comfortable." 

According to Matt, comfort is essential. It's really important in the 
Army, he says, because you're always on your feet. Cadet Dinwiddle picked 
up a few tricks about comfort from his veteran counterparts while he was 
training at Fort Knox in the summer. 

"When you first get your boots, they don't fit at all," he said. "You have 
to go through this whole process. You have to soak your boots in water, 
then you have to walk around in them to get the feel right in them, then 
you have to let them sit and completely dry. The next time you wear them, 
they're broken in." 

According to Matt, a cadet's boots can tell a lot about his or her job in 
the military. 

"These boots aren't polished at all," he said. "You can clean them, but 
they'll never get quite to the same level. People who are actually in the field 
the most are the people with the dirtiest boots. People who have the new 
boots are the ones who sit in the office." 

In addition, if someone's laces are not tied very tightly, it shows that the 
cadet does not do much work in the field, he said. If someone's laces are 
tied tighter, it shows he or she is in the field more often and is a go-getter. 

Matt will become a 2nd Lt. in the US Army upon graduation from Elon. 

LESLEY COWIE / EDITOR IN CHIEF 



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LEFT: Sophomore Taylor Brownstein poses in his 
uniform. Cadet KImberly White emerges from the 
pool during the ROTC Combat Water Survival Test. 
This event measures the cadet's ability to swim 
with full equipment under multiple conditions. 

BELOW: Cadet Philip Grimes receives the German 
Armed Forces Badge for Military Proficiency. 
During the spring semester, representatives from 
the German Army traveled to Elon to test the 
ROTC Cadets for this coveted foreign badge. To 
earn this award, Elon Cadets participated In two 
rigorous days of testing. Photos courtesy of Major 
Stephen Thompson, Chris Sonzogni and Alex Litoff. 





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I Ion Volunteers, or EV!, is an organization on 
, campus that offers dozens of outlets for students 

^^to share service with others around the Burlington 
area and beyond. Through trips, conferences and 
programs, students can learn about and participate 
in different kinds of service. EV! focuses on campus 
outreach to boost student involvement throughout the 
year with Elon 101 speakers, bulletin boards in residence 
halls and collaborating with other organizations for 
service involvement. 

The Kernodle Center is the campus headquarters 
for service. The center has strong relationships with 
community partners in the area and sets up tasks for 
students depending on the organizations needs. Tliey 
also look for out-of-area opportunities and set up service 
trips each year such as Katrina relief or abroad practices. 

This year, EV! introduced a new program, "Get on the 
Bus." The program was meant to help students venture out 
in the community and perform an afternoon of service, 
with the hope that students would go out on their own 
after feeling the rewards of giving. They also conducted 
a "Stop Hunger Now" program where students helped 
package 15,000 meals to be sent to places around the 
world with the greatest need. 

RACHEL BERTONE / STAFF WRITER 



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The 2010 edition of Elon University's yearbook, Phi Psi Cli, is like no other. 
Major changes have occurred for this edition of the book, including new 
sections and positions available for students. Lesley Cowie, the editor in 
chief of Phi Psi Cli, not only made significant changes with the construction of 
the yearbook for her tinal year at Elon but also improvements with the way that 
Phi Psi Cli works. 

"The theme for this yearbook is 'Work Hard, Play Hard,'" Lesley said. "Elon is 
a school that prides itself on the number of students who study abroad, volunteer 
and participate in research. It is also our home-away-from-home, a place (and 
time) where we will have had some of our best memories and have made some 
of our greatest friends. Therefore, we came to the conclusion that Elon students 
work hard, and they play hard." 

The changes that have been made to the yearbook are noteworthy. 
Undergraduate pictures have been eliminated to focus and highlight the senior 
class, a smart way to dedicate and remember the seniors' final, and likely, most 
memorable year at Elon. Another area of improvement is the quality of stories, 
designs and page layouts. With the amount of progress that Phi Psi Cli is getting 
this year, it shows promise and potential to be an award-winning yearbook. 

AVERY LUCAS / STAFF WRITER 



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LEFT; Senior Rebecca Wetherbee and freshman 
Lindsay Kimble copy edit the week's newspaper 
in The Pendulum office. The 2009 newspaper 
staff poses with its Pacemal<er award. 

ABOVE: Senior Ashley Barnas records a football 
game for The Pendulum Online. 

RIGHT:The Phi Psi Cli staff hands out 
yearbooks and information about the 
publication. Lesley Cowie, editor in chief of Phi 
Psi Cli, distributes the 2009 yearbook to passing 
students at the organization fair. Photos 
courtesy of David Wells and Randy Piland. 



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Tucked away on the corner of downtown Elon, 
the Live Oak offices provide an escape and quiet 
work environment for student team members. 

EstabUshed in 2007, Live Oak Communications 
is a student-run communications agency. Catering 
to real-world clients, the students are responsible 
for the public relations for the clients and creating 
promotional materials, like Web sites, videos and 
brochures. 

With faculty adviser Lee Bush at the helm, the 
agency has received praise and recognition during the 
past few years and has steadily grown. For the first time 
since opening, the agency had to nearly double its staff 
for the spring 2010 semester to accommodate a larger 
client list. Eight organizations now employ Live Oak, 
with many more seeking a coveted client spot. 

Live Oak Communications is beneficial in 
many ways. For the students, the agency provides 
professional work experience, and for the clients, the 
agency is the perfect solution to avoid budget-busting 
campaigns. 

Within Live Oak, each client is assigned a team of 
account executives who work directly with the client in 
achieving their goals. Each account team then consults 
with a single creative team, who manages all of the 
creative work that needs to be completed for the client. 

At the end of Winter Term 2010, the agency won 
two awards for work done in the last year. Specifically, 
one of those awards was for a social networking 
site created for a local veterinary hospital. The site, 
called Paw-2-Paw, enabled pet owners to link up and 
communicate with each other about their animals. 

KRISTEN WRENN / STAFF DESIGNER 



Live Oak 
Communications 




CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Creative 
team members Kristen Wrenn and Stephanie 
Militello prep the camera for a shoot at the 
Greensboro Children's Museum. The museum 
hired Live Oak Communications to promote its 
Edible Schoolyard project. Christina Hamilton, 
Stephanie Militello and Lauren Warr film 
footage for a promotional campaign for the 
Edible Schoolyard in Greensboro. The students 
work directly with their clients to provide 
promotional material. Students oversee Kristen 
Wrenn as she works with the video camera. 
The Live Oak students must sometimes work 
in groups to get their work done in a timely 
manner. Photos courtesy of Kristen Wrenn. 




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CLOCKWISE: DJs from 

WSOE participate In a 

Battle of the Bands show. 

The ESTV executive 

staff sit down to plan the 

programming and dialogue 

to all shows for the coming 

week. The Win Stuff 

coordinators pose on set. 

The entire ESTV staff poses 

for a group photo. The 

show cannot be completed 

without each member of 

the team. Members of 

WSOE show their continued 

appreciation for music, 

by playing their own 

instruments on stage. Photos 

by Lindsay Fendt. 





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urn up the radio! Put the TV on! Elon students have done 
wondrous things to relate to the community through media. 
Among these student-run and -produced organizations is Phoenix 

14 News. 

Showing every Monday at 6 p.m., the Phoenix 14 Newscast has followed 
stories, uncovered mysteries, and informed the students about the current 
events of Elon and the world. 

Other programs produced on Elon Student Television, or ESTV, include 
"One on One Sports," a sports program that looks at sports from many 
different angles, like the topic of steroids or the predictions of the MBA 
Playoffs. 

Elon's own radio station, WSOE, has also done a lot this year With 
different radio shows every day, station 89.3 is always an interesting and fun 
channel to tune into. From the show "So You Wanna Be A Rock Star?" to 
"Peanut Butter lelly Time" to "Sports Show," WSOE is never boring. It brings 
the Elon community together and really provides an outlet tor student's 
voices. 

These organizations allow students to get involved with different modes 
of communication, learn about different mediums and all while having fun! 
Only here at Elon can such a sound be heard! 

JESSICA SCHOENHOLTZ / STAFF WRITER 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 55 



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Isabella Cannon Leadership Program 



ABOVE: Phase IV members stop for a quick group photo 
at their retreat in September. They spent the weekend in 
Greensboro discussing their leadership legacy and reflecting 
on past phases. Photos courtesy of ICLP. 

RIGHT: Seniors Sara Pasquinelli, Tory Chase and Shane 
Morris conduct a meeting with underclassmen as part of their 
Phase IV Citizenship Connection project. Mallory Anderson 
discusses personal leadership goals with the Phase II members 
at their retreat. Phase 11 members spend the year focusing on 
personal and organizational change. 





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Mallon' Anderson, the Director of the Center for Leadership, asked 
a group of Emerging Leaders to think of a paradigm shift that they 
have encountered. She asked this question as part of a leadership 
workshop in which they focused on Stephen Covey's book, "Seven Habits of 
Highly Effective People." The group paired off to discuss their answers and in 
doing so learned more about their fellow leaders and themselves. 

The group eventually reconvened and had a discussion about everyone's 
paradigm shifts. The discussion was eye-opening and was a great way for this 
group of freshmen to become Emerging Leaders as they begin their journey 
wth the Isabella Cannon Leadership Program. 

This four-phase program encourages students to learn about and develop 
their leadership styles. By going to different workshops and interacting with 
new groups, students expand their knowledge of leadership styles and learn 
how to apply these sU'les to their leadership positions on campus. 

JESSICA SCHOENHOLTZ / STAFF WRITER 




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ealingwith 

be overwhelming, but fortunately 
Elon offers a selection of religious 
groups that students may join. Whether 
students need to ask a higher power for help 
or are just seeking a community in which 
to worship and explore religion, Elon offers 
many options. With 12 prominent religious 
organizations on campus, Elon has an outlet 
for everyone, regardless of religion. 

Some of the unique organizations that 
students may join are Fellowship of Christian 
Athletes, Elon Hillel, and Elon Go.spel Choir. 
Becoming a member of one of these groups 
helps students integrate and meet people with 
similar values. In order to cultivate friendships 
and encourage students to explore their faith, 
some organizations, such as Catholic Campus 
Ministries and InterVarsity hold beach 
retreats in late September and early October. 
In sticking with its religious roots. The 
Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual 
Life ensures that students have many 
religious organizations to choose from, 
encouraging diversity and exploration of faith. 

BLAIR MENZEL / STAFF WRITER 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Over 
the summer, Holland House, a place 
of worship for students on campus, 
moved to a new location beyond the 
railroad tracks. Following the move, 
students, faculty and staff welcomed 
and blessed the house's new location. 
The members of Eton's Jewish 
organization, Hillel, demonstrate 
their support and beliefs at the 
organization fair. Elon has dozens of 
religious organizations, from Hillel 
to Baptist Student Union. Students 
usually meet on a weekly basis and 
enjoy fellowship, discussion, worship 
and even meals. The Baptist Student 
Union, as well as InterVarsity 
Christian Fellowship, show students 
at the organization fair what they 
are all about. Photos courtesy of The 
Pendulum and Randy Piland. 



4RD, PLAY HARD 59 



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fighting intolerance 



he Elon University Multicultural Center presented a slu)rt film comprised 
of seven separate scenarios of intolerance on Oct. 27 at Carousel Cinemas 

in Alamance Crossing. The center hosted the full-length screening in 

celebration of its newly-developed diversity education program, DEEP Impact. 

"1 hope that DEEP Impact will excite the audience on issues shown in the tilm, 
involving race, class, gender, se.\ual orientation, religion, disability and national 
origin," said Leon Williams, Multicultural Center Director and DEEP Impact 
curriculum coordinator. 

DEEP Impact is a multimedia education tool comprised of the full-length film, 
a user's manual and various assessment tools. These instruments e.\pose audiences 
to subtle and overt acts of intolerance and examine solutions to these incidents. The 
Multicultural Center hopes DEEP Impact's audience will be able to understand and 
overcome diverse situations in their everyday experiences as a result of the program. 

"The more that DEEP Impact becomes a part of conversation, the more diversity 
and diversity training are a part of everyday conversation," said Melissa |ordan, 
the assistant director of the Multicultural Center "Bringing about awareness and 
providing tools for people to discuss diversity is the No. 1 goal of the program." 

Tlie Multicultural Center aspires to be the leading premiere archetype of 
multicultural education and student development. Its mission is to provide Elon 
students a transformative multicultural education needed to function effectively in 
a diverse world. The Center strives to create an environment in which all students 
can engage in active learning strategies to increase their competencies in the area of 
multiculturalism. 



KELSEY GLOVER / CONTRIBUTOR 





LEFT TO RIGHT: Elon students demonstrate their acceptance of diversity 
by posing for a photo. Members of Spectrum participate in a gay pride 
parade. Spectrum is a support group committed to Increasing visibility and 
bettering the lives of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people at Elon 
and beyond. The Black Cultural Society works to highlight the essence of 
the "black experience." BCS Is open to all students interested in being an 
effective support system by providing events that foster Black culture. 
Photos by Sarah Chaffee and Randy Plland. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: The Virginia-based band Carbon Leaf 
performed at Elon during orientation weel<end. The five-man band l<ept 
the crowd's attention between songs by sharing their personal Elon 
experiences. The lead singer, Barry Privett, recalled a time when he 
visited his sister while she was attending Elon. Acoustic performer Jared 
Campbell performs at SUBIive. Campbell has been nominated for "Best 
Musical Performer" for Campus Activities Magazine Reader's Choice 
Awards two years in a row. Freshman RSA Student Executive Board 
Member Christine Conti checks sophomores Angela Muntean and Jenny 
Austin's guess sheet in RSA's campus-wide game of Clue. Evan Davis, 
SGA executive vice president, and Adam Walton, executive treasurer, 
meet with SGA President Justin Peterson to discuss finances and 
strategy for the year. Photos by My Nguyen, Lindsay Fendt and Katie 
Lazor. 

Student Union Board (SUB) and Resident Student Association (RSA) are great 
organizations that help students become more involved in campus life, meet 
new people and expand their horizons by putting on fun social events. Both 
organizations plan a slew of campus- wide events featuring concerts, bingo nights 
and annual events such as Cram Jam to help students de-stress around exam times. 

This year, RSA introduced "Campus- Wide CLUE" based off the popular board 
game. Hundreds of students participated in the universit)''s first murder mystery. 
SUB brought hilarious comedians and performers to campus through their SUBIive 
events including Roy Wood Jr. and "The Black Jew Dialogues." 

Both organizations are comprised of student leaders who put in hard work year 
round to deliver these events to campus. Joe Slocum, president of RSA, said he has 
made great friendships through the organization and it has really enhanced his 
campus experience. Ke\in Clang, secretary of SUB, also mentioned the great bonds 
he has made but said one of his favorite parts of SUB is being able to see the success 
of his work. 

RACHEL BERTONE / STAFF WRITER 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



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64 WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 





L 



Getting Down to Work 



1 Ion students know how to have a great 
time and enjoy themselves, but more 
than that, Elon students know when to 
get to work. Academically, Elon students push 
themselves and learn all they can from their 
classes and extra-curricular activities. Students 
become involved with more than one of the 
available 150 campus activities, while also II 
maintaining high GPAs, showing how well- 
rounded and balanced the student body is here. 
As students at the No. 1 school to watch and 
the No. 2 Southern masters-level university on 
U.S. News and World Reports list, Elon students 
have a concern for the greater good and value 
global perspectives. 

Tlie freshman class gets smarter every year, 
with an average academic GPA of 3.97, showing 
that Elon is raising its academic standards every 
year. About 40 percent of students are either on 
the Dean or Presidents list, and students engage 
themselves both academically and in the global 
community. Seventy-one percent of students 
study abroad and within their time at Elon 
develop a knowledge and passion for being a 
global citizen. Newsweek- Kaplan named Elon 
the nation's "leader in engaged learning," and 
87 percent of the student body participates in 
volunteer service. Elon students work hard to 
help their community and make the world a 
better place in any way they can. 

The Elon University mission statement 
explains that at Elon "we provide a dynamic 
and challenging undergraduate curriculum 
grounded in the traditional liberal arts and 
sciences and complemented by distinctive 
professional and graduate programs." Indeed, 
Elons academics are both challenging and 
fascinating, and the school has the high 
freshman retention rate of 89 percent. At Elon 
University, the students pride themselves on 
their academic achievements and manage to 
work hard and play hard in their time here. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 65 



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Do college students know what LEED is? No, but they 
know what sustainability is, and they know that the new 
Lindner Hall is the most sustainable building on campus. 

LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental 
Design. Established by the U.S. Green Building Council, LEED 
is a standard for sustainable buUdings. Architects, engineers and 
project managers pursue LEED accreditation to become informed 
and knowledgeable on how to build environmentally sustainable 
structures. 

Elaine Durr, a LEED Accredited Professional, guided 
Elon through its endeavors to become more environmentally 
sustainable. She managed and oversaw the construction of Lindner 
Hail, the building for the School of Arts and Sciences. 

While pursuing LEED certification, a project team must set a 
certification goal and meet the corresponding requirements for 



that level. Lindner Hall was awarded LEED Gold Certification 
from the USGBC. 

Lindner Hall met the qualifications of LEED Gold Certification 
by featuring solar photovoltaic panels on the roof, as well as 
including a solar water heating system inside. The energy created 
by these systems will be used in the building and reduce the need 
for fossil fuel-based energy. 

LEED is a green building standard that is rapidly gaining 
popularity among those interested in sustainability and 
construction. With buildings like Lindner Hall, it is clear that 
President Leo Lambert's strategy for the future of Elon University 
is to construct buildings as indestructible as the phoenix mascot. 

LESLEY COWIE / EDITOR IN CHIEF ; 



66 



ACADEMICS 







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The School of Business had a busy year 
developing a new strategic plan and 
figuring out how to better engage students 
while pointing them in the direction of a successful 
career Along with the various opportunities the 
school already provides to students, including 
organizations to help them build professional 
connections, they recently launched the Chandler 
Family Professional Sales Center. This provides 
outreach and education for students interested in a 
career in sales. 

The School of Business offers three majors to 
students, including accounting, economics and 
business administration, as well as various minors 
and concentrations such as entrepreneurship, 
management and finance. Of these, business 
administration is the most popular major with 
finance and marketing as the most popular 
concentrations. 

With the current state of the economy in the 
United States, the School of Business also had 
to adapt some of its lesson plans this year to 
prepare students for this situation in the work 
force. Professors have spent more time on the 
imperfections of the market and fiscal policy. They 
are also emphasizing the importance of critical 
thinking and problem solving skills so students are 
prepared for multiple types of jobs. 

RACHEL BERTONE / STAFF WRITER 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Elon 
University opened the Ernest A. Koury, Sr. 
Business Center on campus in 2007. The 
60,000-square-foot building has three stories, 
and its William Garrard Reed Finance Center 
simulates a real stock trading room, with 
plasma screens to deliver cable financial news 
and an electronic stock crawl that provides 
the latest data from global financial markets. 
Photos by Kate Austin and The Pendulum. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



69 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Senior 
broadcast major Max Cantor 
demonstrates the proper use 
of a video camera. The School 
of Communications frequently 
reminds students of their 
responsibility to uphold the laws; 
students, faculty and staff were 
given the opportunity to comment 
freely on the First Amendment 
board outside McEwen 
communications building for one 
day. While editing a video in Final 
Cut Pro, senior Peyton Lea stops 
for a quick photo. Photos courtesy 
of The Pendulum. 




-V 



70 



ACADEMICS 




munications 



I he School of Communications is a nationally 
accredited program that offers many 
impressive opportunities for its students. 

From internships to student media organizations 
to trips across the country, communications students 
are constantly involved and striving for success. The 
school offers four majors: Journalism, Media Arts 
and Entertainment, Communication Science and 
Strategic Communications. Of these four, Strategic 
Communications is the most popular. 

With the world becoming more technological 
every day, the school is alwrays looking for ways 
to update its own technology. Students become 
proficient in necessary software programs such 
as Photoshop, Final Cut Pro, InDesign and 
Dreamweaver, as well as having access to everything 
from still cameras to light kits through Elon 
Television. A plan is already In the works to make the 
television studio high definition. 

The School of Communications expanded its 
program this year and created a master's program 
in Interactive Media. The program is only one year 
and teaches students to think strategically using all 
media platforms. According to department chair, 
Don Grady, the school is considering adding a PhD 
program in the future. 

RACHEL BERTONE / STAFF WRITER 




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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Students from the School of Education 
volunteer at local schools to tutor students. Elon's students show 
local students how much fun it is to read, while also boosting their 
vocabularies. Gifted students from area high schools have the 
opportunity to participate in the Elon Academy alongside Elon student 
volunteers. This student uses chess to master important concepts. 
Photos courtesy of The Pendulum. 



Elon's Schodl of Educalion strives to prepare 
tuture educators who will be creative 
teachers with the skills to meet the needs 
ot students in 21st century schools. The capstone 
experience as an education major is student 
teaching: that last-semester challenge when the 
student takes full control of a real classroom and 
teaches his or her chosen subject for a whole 
semester This experience looms in his or her 
future from the day the student declares a major 
in education. After years of discussing child 
psychology, the politics of public education and 
ways to accommodate students' many diverse 
needs, student teaching finally arrives. 

I must admit, the first week or so is pretty 
daunting. I started to realize that an hour with 
my students can take five hours of planning, and 
the unpredictability of fire drills, nosebleeds and 
last-minute staff meetings is hard to plan for in 
the first place. However, after settling in, I had 
the exhilarating realization that I really was ready 
for this. My Elon education in - well, education 
- had prepared me to handle these challenges. I 
certainly knew my subject, and through a little 
trial and error, I figured out how to take control 
of my classroom. Suddenly I was walking down 
the halls of that elementary school with the 
confidence that after so many years as a student, 
I fit in as a teacher. And although I cannot 
speak for every education major at Elon, I feel 
comfortable stating that most of us were excited 
and relieved to find out that we really did learn 
something applicable in college. 

I never realized when I came to Elon how 
truly valuable my education here would be. My 
professors and fellow students in the School of 
Education have shared behavior management 
tips followed by horror stories of the times when 
they lost control of a class and chaos reigned. 
The latter kind of story helped me more than 
anything else because it made me understand that 
even the most experienced teachers sometimes 
feel nervous and frustratingly flawed. But with a 
degree in education from Elon University, I know 
that I will start my first year of teaching with 
confidence. 1 am as prepared as 1 possibly could 
be, thanks to professors who take special interest 
in mentoring each one of us and molding us into 
the kind of teachers that today's students truly 
need. 

LAURA FRAASE / CONTRIBUTOR 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



73 



raduate 



rograms 




CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT: On 

the Mekong Delta, Eton Law students 

Lila Riley, Michael Davis, Jenny Sweet 

and Katherine Cadwallader take a boat 

ride. The law students actively seek 

legal advice and instruction during a 

seminar. Elon Law students meet with 

lawyers from Gide, Loyrette, Nouel, 

an international law firm in Vietnam. 

Maria Rojas presents her winter term 

project for Earth School Costa Rica 

to faculty and other iMedia students. 

Cory Morrison presents his winter term 

project for FL JADIS to faculty and iMedia 

students. Photos courtesy of Philip 

Craft, Randy Piland and The Pendulum. 




-jjjiMLLjmyaK 



74 



ACADEMICS 




One of the many great opportunities that I have had through Elon's iMedia program was working with 
an NGO (non-government organization) for Osteogenesis Imperfecta in Panama. I worked alongside 
nine other iMedia students, taking pictures and shooting video, engaged in the experience of a 
hfetime. 

My teammates encountered many obstacles along the way, including a language barrier and navigating 
through unfamiliar territory with all our gear. Within a short period of time, we traveled to many different 
parts of the country, visiting families affected by Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), a genetic disease that produces 
fragile bones. 

Panamanian treatment is 12 years behind what can be provided in the United States, and awareness is low. 
Some Panamanians do not even know that they have OI and attribute constant fracturing to bad luck. 

Our goal was to build a Web site for the foundation that would help increase awareness, improve medical 
conditions and raise funds. We gathered and produced content on a very quick turn around during Winter 
Term and superseded the e.xpectations of the NGO. 

MARC DEROBERTS / CONTRIBUTOR 





WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 75 



i 



Periclean 

Scholars 



The Periclean Scholars program is a competitive, scholarly 
three-year experience with rigorous academic requirements 
and global humanitarian outreach initiatives. By embodying 
the mantra, "Think globally, act locally," each class of Periclean 
Scholars has raised major awareness about global issues and major 
funds to aid those issues. 

This year's graduating class of scholars was passionate about 
rural health care in Ghana. After two and a half years, the class 
of 33 students had raised more than $50,000 with which their 
partners in the rural village of Kpoeta constructed a health care 
clinic for the village's 10,000 residents and neighbors. 

During Winter Term 2009, four fortunate Periclean Scholars 
witnessed the grand opening ceremony of the health clinic, but 
their efforts were far from completed. There exists in Ghana 



a phenomenon known as "brain drain," in which medical 
professionals with government-funded training seek higher paying 
jobs in other countries, leaving Ghana with a severe shortage of 
medical professionals and large investment losses. 

The Periclean Scholars are currently raising funds to build two 
staff housing units as an incentive for the government-appointed 
nurse and midwife to stay in Kpoeta. Thus, the overall project will 
be sustainable, effective and life changing for everyone involved, 
thanks to partnerships in the village, inquiries to the community's 
needs and desires and very close communication. 

As the 2010 Periclean Scholars graduate, one of their most 
important and rewarding experiences from Elon will the 
opportunity to truly be global citizens through the Periclean 
Scholars program. 

MICA MCCULLOUGH / CONTRIBUTOR 




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76 ACADEMICS 





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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Happily 
getting her copy of "A Thousand Splendid 
Suns" signed, senior Jordan Frederick 
stands beside Khaled Hosseini. Aspiring 
journalist Andie Diemer beams at the 
opportunity to meet the successful and 
inspirational Hosseini. The Periclean 
Scholars spent time with Hosseini talking 
and posing for photos. Senior Kelly 
Parshall introduces an inductee into the 
Class of 201 3 Periclean Scholars. The 
scholars meet with Dr. Francis Amedahe 
at the Kpedze Clinic in Ghana. This was 
the closest clinic to Kpoeta prior to 
the construction of the Kpoeta Clinic. 
Photos courtesy of Tom Arcaro and The 
Pendulum. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



77 




ACADEMICS 




be/kLIBRARY 



Belk Libran- opened on 
Ianuan'31,2000, forall 
Elon students, facult\' and 
staff. ASH million dollar project, 
the library was named for Carol 
Grotnes Belk, whose portrait hangs 
on the first floor near the staircase. 

The Library is and impressive 
75,000 square feet and has an 
eight-layer, hurricane-proof, roof 
to protect it from damage and 
destruction. Belk Library holds 
approximately 300,000 volumes 
and has over 32,000 full-text online 
journals. It is open every day for 
the Elon University community to 
enjoy and utilize. 

On Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2009, 
Elon hosted its first library rave 
in the first floor of Belk. Students 
were inspired by, and driven to 
compete against, UNC Chapel 
Hill, who had notoriously hosted 
such an event before. The event 
included blow-up balloons, glow 
sticks and crowd surfing among 
the students. Although there were 
some technical difficulties with 
the music, the overall event was a 
success and will be hosted annually 
for years to come. 

AVERY LUCAS / STAFF WRITER 





ABOVE: Students dance 
to Miley Cyrus's "Party in 
the USA" at the Library 
Rave, in addition to their 
dance moves, students 
show off their smiies 
and glow-in-the-dark 
neckiaces. 

LEFT: Senior Rachel 
Zeiiinger dances outside 
of the library while 
waiting to enter the rave. 
Photos courtesy of The 
Pendulum. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



79 







CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: 

Eleanor Graham Meacham 

presents "Unveiling the Bidding 

Process of the Olympics: An 

Empirical Analysis." Students 

present undergraduate 

research at SURF Day in 

Koury Business Center. Senior 

Rebecca Wetherbee presents 

her research on Censorship 

and Evolving Media Policy in 

China. Daniel Glass explains 

his presentation, titled the 

Fabrication of Ferroelastomeric 

Microparticles, to an 

engaged student. Photos 

by Kate Austin. 






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80 



ACADEMICS 



One of the many great opportunitie!. available tor students at Lion 
is undergraduate research. A vast number of students spend 
hundreds of hours conducting experiments and researching top- 
- . der a taculty advisor. In late April, students have the chance to pres- 
u [heir findings and show otf" their hard work to the campus at SURF, or 
i ~^!udent Undergraduate Research Forum. 

this year's SURF, there were many interesting presentations from a 
.. i i\ of majors, including "The Effects of Culture on Gendered Stereo- 
pts of Emotion" by Leigh Lampley and "Iconic Photos of the Vietnam 
. .11 .ind their Influence on Collective Memory" by Angle Lovelace. 
"senior Caroline Fox gave a Sl'RF presentation on women in the 



media during the 20UcS presidential election. She said she chose the topic 
because at the time, the election had just ended, and there was not much 
research done on the topic. 

Fox. like many others that presented their research, had been working 
on the topic for years. Fox said that although the research was tough, it 
has made her into a more motivated, hard-working person. "I've learned 
I can do an)lhing I set my mind to," she said. "At first, 1 didn't think there 
would be any way 1 would finish, but now I have a paper over 100 pages!" 



RACHEL BEDTONE ' STAFF WRITER 



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fwmtomg arvl censoring information distributed via the Internet, 
television, radio and print 
1 • Chinese Internet Service Providers are responsible for momtoring all 
Vteb sites, e-ma/Zs, blogs, chat rooms and forums accessed by their users. 
• Ihe lack of privacy and threat of punishment for dissenters has lead to a 
chiBngeHea among professional and citizen journalists in the country. 
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niting Opportunities: 

Scholarships 



Going abroad has been an experience that can be matched by no 
other experience that I have ever undergone. It was not until 
the study abroad experience was actually upon me that I truly 
understood how truly special it was and how truly lucky I have been to 
receive such a chance. 

During the summer of 2009, 1 had the good fortune to be a part of the 
"Galicia: The Other Spain" study abroad program. I still cannot believe 
how eye-opening the experience was! In Spain, I was able to see vast 
diversity and learn so much about a different culture and different people. 
What's more, my Spanish proficiency improved greatly. I saw and did 
many new things, and I made new friends. 

Meeting these people and learning these things have ignited such a 
passion inside me that I cannot put into words. I am so truly thankful 
for my experience abroad, and I can never comprehensively voice the 
sincere thanks I have for the Leon and Lorraine Watson Scholarship 
Program who believed in me enough to hand me the most unforgettable 
experience I have ever had in my life - the opportunity to study in Spain. 

CHINWE NWOKO / CONTRIBUTOR 




82 



ACADEMICS 



tkj 




I 




CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Senior Kevin Swett converses with 
Gerald Whittington, the vice president for business, finance and 
technology, during the reception. President Leo Lambert addresses 
all the scholarship recipients and donors, expressing his gratitude for 
their service and support. The scholarship recipients and donors mingle 
and chat during dinner. Senior Anna Davis represents the scholarship 
recipients, as she spends a moment giving thanks. Photos by Kim Walker. 




WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 83 



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On April 13, 2010, the Convocation for Honors 
ceremony celebrated the liberal arts and 
sciences at Elon University. In addition, the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society was installed at Elon during this 
ceremony. This annual event honored Dean's List and 
President's List students, graduate students, faculty and 
the upcoming graduating class for their achievements as 
part of the Elon University community. 

Journalist Nicholas Kristof commented upon his 
experiences abroad during his headlining address. He 
has written about the world's most obstinate problems 
and has traveled to 140 countries as a journalist. 
He has dealt with global poverty and genocide and 
has effectively used journalism to bring a voice of 
compassion to issues in the developing world. 

In a speech titled, "A Call to Action: Encouraging 
Young People to Join the 'World's Fight' and Take on a 
Cause Larger than Themselves," Pulitzer Prize-winning 
New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof explained 
that students should engage in worthy causes to give 
meaning to their lives. His speech recounted travel 
experiences and asked questions about the amount 
of care that Americans have for helping other needy 
countries. He encouraged students to discover causes 
that they care about and to pursue action to make a 
difference in the world. 

JANE SIEGEL / ACADEMICS SECTION EDITOR 



^^y 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Seniors Ashley Barnas, Laura Smith, Rachel 
Cieri and Alexa Milan proudly wear their graduation gowns at the last honors 
convocation ceremony. Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist 
Nicholas Kristof called on students to find causes they care about and take stepij 
wherever they are to make a difference in the world. Phi Beta Kappa Society 
Secretary John Churchill greets Russell Gill, a professor of English and president I 
of Elon's Eta Chapter of North Carolina, during the installation of Phi Beta 
Kappa. Photos courtesy of Ashley Barnas and Kim Walker. 



84 



ACADEMICS 




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WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 85 



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Dn James Earl Danieley 

An Elon Instit 




CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Dr. James Earl Danieley starts! 

his career at Elon University as a student. This is his senior 

picture, taken in 1946. Dr. Danieley and his wife Verona pose |i 

together happily in the 1960s, in 1996, Dr. Danieley, right, { 

shakes hands with former Elon president, Fred Young, left. 

Jane Romer, a French senior faculty fellow, and Jim Pace, a ■ 

religious studies professor, make plans to retire from teaching 

at Elon University at the end of this year. As a student, 'i 

Danieley was able to finish the chemistry curriculum in I 

two years and now shares this knowledge as a professor. I 

RIGHT: Frank Harris, a physics senior faculty fellow, along I 

with Anne Cassebaum and Lamar Bland, both English j 

senior faculty fellows, will also retire after this year. The 

distinguished Dr. Danieley shares his wisdom during a speech. I 

Photos courtesy of Belk Library archives and The Pendulum, i 



86 



ACADEMICS 



ution 



I. Earl Danieley, who served as president of 
Elon from 1957-1973, was honored as part 
of the annual Founders Day celebrations to 
erate the lives of faculty that have impacted 
the development of Elon University. An 
Alamance County resident, Danieley graduated 
from Elon in 1946 and received his graduate 
degree from UNC Chapel Hill in organic 
chemistry. He then conducted postdoctoral 
research at Johns Hopkins Universit)'. 

He started his career at Elon as a chemistry 
professor and was dean of Elon University from 
1953 to 1956. Danieley was then named the si.xth 
president of Elon University in 1957 and stepped 
down from this role in 1973 to commit the future 
of his career to teaching and playing a different 
role in educating students. In 1987, Danieley 
decided to serve as the director of planned 
giving in the development office and reduce 
his teaching hours. He held this position until 
1992 and was named president emeritus in this 
year. From 1983 to 1995, Danieley served on the 
UNC Board of Governors. Danieley has proven 
to be an immensely powerful leader on the Elon 
University campus. 

Danieley continues to teach organic chemistry 
and a Winter Term class about the history of 
Elon, showing his care and passion for educating 
Elon students. He is one of the most important 
faculty members at this university and is loved by 
his coworkers and students alike. 

JANE SIEGEL / ACADEMICS SECTION EDITOR 




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WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 87 



What has been your best memory from freshman year? 



"Making birthday rap videos to post on each of our hallmates' 
Facebook walls for each of their birthdays and going to Atlanta 
with the Communications Fellows. " - Will Anderson 





"One of my favorite memories was when we all took 
Christmas card pictures. We coordinated our outfits \ 
and took photos around our recently- decorated fake 
tree. " - Katherine Wise 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Pennsylvannia parents go the extra mile to ensure a happy and safe 
delivery of their child to Elon's campus. Freshmen friends enjoy the free time that college life has 
given them by dancing at Sandy's Bar and Grill. Students check in with upperclassmen during freshman 
orientation. This parent helps move all her child's belongings into her dorm room. The orientation staff 
also helps carry freshman items to the dorms. Photos courtesy of Lindsay Fendt and Jane Siegel. 



ACADEMICS 



■^l 








Where is the place to go on Thursday 
nights if you're looking to meet 
freshmen? Sandy's Bar and Grill. It is 
the one place freshmen flock to on a single night 
no matter the weather conditions. The cold does 
not stop them during Winter Term, and the spring 
rain does not impede their plans for a fun "Thirsty 
Thursday." 

Sandy's is a staple for freshmen at Elon; it is the 
popular place to dance, sweat and meet people. 
Upperclassmen and Burlington locals are rarely 
seen on a Thursday night, as it is overwhelmed 
with freshmen. As the music starts and the dancing 
begins, a long line can be seen out the front doors. 
The events of Thursday nights can usually be 
summed up into one symbol - the Sandy's "X. " 
This is placed on the hands of every person who 
is under 21 that goes into the bar on Thursdays. 
As the reminiscing happens on Fridays, a good 
laugh can be shared over what happened the night 
before. With all of this, it is not hard to call Sandy's 
a landmark of Elon - at least for the freshman class 
on Tltursday nights. 

One of the unique aspects of being in college is 
having much more time to spend making friends 
and developing meaningful relationships. In high 
school, there was a sLx-hour school day in which 
you were with your classmates. But in college, 
there is much more time to spend with your peers. 
This freedom to choose when to be social makes 
college a great time to really develop social skills. 

EVAN BONNEY / CONTRIBUTOR 






WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



89 



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With the awkward adjustment of freshman year in the 
past, this year has been a breeze for the sophomore 
class of 2012. With a better sense of belonging at 
Elon and more knowledge of Burlington, the sophomore class 
was able to reach out and embrace the campus with full force. 

One aspect of sophomore year is deciding on a major 
Caitlin Confort said that after she took Communications in a 
Global Age freshman year, it made her realize that was what she 
wanted to do. 

"I'm looking forward to getting more serious with my classes 
and learning more about the real world," Caitlin said. 

Sophomore Margaret Spotts also learned more about her 
major this year. She said she originally declared elementary 
education but after some classes this year, decided to switch to 
middle school education. 

One of the best benefits of being a sophomore is knowing 
more about Burlington and adjusting to the area around Elon. 
"We go off campus a lot more now," Margaret said. "I'm a 
regular at the Graham Soda Shop!" 

RACHEL BERTONE/STAFF WRITER 



"I know where things are 
in Alamance County, but 
mostly because I was lucky 
enough to bring my car from 
Charlotte my first year of 
school. If I didn 't have a 
car on campus, I probably 
wouldn 't know where many 
of the places are located in 
Alamance County. " 

- Ellie Stratton Brook, sophomore 



\ 



ABOVE: Brittney Baglino, Sian Rucker, Kathleen Donnelly, Lina Pa< 
RIGHT: Lina Patton and Sian Rucker dress in green to celebrate St 



ton and Emily S 
Patrick's Day. P 



for a highlighter party, 
of Lina Patton. 



90 



ACADEMICS 




WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 91 





"Vie Class 
of 2011 has 
achieved so 
much in three 
years. 
We have student athletes 
that have worked 
tirelessly to post winning 
seasons, performing arts 
majors that have put 
on amazing shows and 
concerts and students 
who have gone above 
and beyond their major 
requirements to conduct 
research in order to 
better themselves and 
their respective fields, 
just to name a few. " 

Mike Nowak, 
Junior Class President 





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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Elon University 
junior and West End manager, Chris Chipman, 
pours a beer for a customer at West End Bar. 
Because of a busy schedule, junior Jonathan 
Sweeney finds taking naps essential to making it 
through the day, even if it means falling asleep in 
Belk. Michael Nachajski, Luke O'Rourke, Taylor 
Woodward and Katie Lazor document their 
fun times together in college during a trip to 
the Outer Banks. Katie Lazor, Kate Vogt, Meg 
Anderson, Ashley McGraw, Julie Halm and Liz 
Harrington pose near Kylemore Abbey on the 
west coast of Ireland. Photos courtesy of Brian 
Allenby, Katie Lazor and The Pendulum. 



92 ACADEMICS 



The clas> ol 2l)l 1 has come a lony ua\' in thiec years. From tackHiig internships to travehng 
across the globe for a semester, the junior class has faced the challenges of growing up head- 
on. Mike Nowak, who served as the junior class president this year, said he is proud of the 
passion and determination the class has put toward ever)thing it seeks to achieve. 

Many changes come along iunior year, including harder classes, new living situations and more 
involvement in the outside world. Most iuniors move otT campus or into apartments for the year, and 
many have e.xprcssed the benefits outside of dorm life. 

"1 feel like I have more independence than I did living in a dorm," Lauren Kcnney said. "Having a 
kitchen is great too!" 

Academic workload becomes a big part of junior year when professors show no mercy to try and 
prepare students for job hunting and senior year. Sarah Talbott said that academics have become more 
of a priority for her than it was the past two years. She said she wished she had put more effort into 
her schoolwork when she was a freshman. Although her courses were challenging, Sarah said this year 
has helped her prepare for senior year, and she is looking forward to making after-graduation plans 
and being able to enjoy the last year with her friends. 

RACHEL BERTONE / STAFF WRITER 




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WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



93 



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ABOVE: Libby Russell and Clay Winklevoss speak with a potential employer. Senior Elon students take part in the career fair to 

explore opportunities for after graduation. 

RIGHT: Emily Silva gets her senior cap and gown portrait taken. Photos by Kate Austin. 



Don't burn any 
bridges: you never 
know wno you 
are going to meet 
and now they will 
re-enter your life. 



Job 

Hunting 

Tips 

for 

Seniors 




Keep real 
connections: 
know I -2 things 
about your 
connection and 
ask them about it 



eep a Kolodex 
with names: write 
helpful reminders 
on the back of 
business cards 
to help you 
remember later. 




^on t ask for a 
job: be specific, 
ask questions that 
will provide you 
with answers that 
will further you in 
your career. 




-ink mutually: 
look up the staff 
on Linkedln and 
utilize mutual 
connections to 
help you make an 
impact. 



Apply for jobs 
early: this will 
allow you to build 
relationships 
and polish your 
resume and cover 
letter 



Ask for an 
informational 
interview: attach 
your resume 
when contacting 
an employee so 
they can review 
your information 



When I entered Elon in fall 2006, 1 was very nervous 
and excited. My freshman roommate in Moffitt 
told me at the end of the year that her first 
impression of me was, "Gosh, this girl has a lot of stuff." Her 
parents figured I was the first child to go to college because I 
was bringing in boxes of drinks and snacks. My advice now 
to college-bound students is to wait untU you get to campus 
to purchase containers, hangers and food. 

In our second semester, my friend Ali had yet to walk on 
the grass at Elon because a senior told her she would be fined 
for it the first week of school. Now we know where to go to 
get the best wraps, which dining hall to go to for breakfast 
and where to hang out on a sunny day. 

Our graduating class went through Elon vritnessing the 
election of the first African- American president with the 
promise of change and the hard-reality of the recession. We 
learned how to do laundry, wash the dishes and pull all- 
nighters for exams and papers. We leave knowing the value 
of a second family of friends and how Elon will only put the 
flags up for our parents. 

KELSEY GWILT / CONTRIBUTOR 



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Prove yourseiT as 
an intern: produce 
quality work and 
go the extra mile. 



Courtesy of 
Scott Gustafson f 
COO), Beth Roberts 
COT), Tom Mullen 
COO) and Olivia 
Hubert-Allen CQ^) 




Shorten your 
resume: keep 
our resume's 
ength to one 
page. 



I 





Help each other 
out: strengthen^ 
the Elon rm^mHk 

by 

Fine 




94 



ACADEMICS 



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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Christina Hamilton landed 
the dream internship - working with CNN is not what 
the typical college student would expect to do. Having 
already been the Online Editor-in-Chief of Elon's 
newspaper, senior Ashley Barnas put her technological 
skills to work when she interned with The Washington 
Post. Aspiring broadcast reporter Tim Barber spent his 
summer interning at 60 Minutes, where he was given the 
opportunity to help produce monumental news pieces. 
Photos courtesy of Nagatha Tonkins. 



A Foot in the Door 



Ion offers students many opportunities to learn in different 
settings - the classroom, on campus, abroad, in the Alamance 
'community and all across the country. The possibilities 
of places in which Elon students can go to truly experience their 
education are seemingly endless. 

Students are encouraged and required to participate in some form 
of engaged learning during their time at the universit)', and these 
engaged learning experiences could be fulfilled through international 
study, undergraduate research, service learning, internships, 
leadership or civic engagement. Specifically, internships provide 
students a way to have real-world experience in the field that they are 
focusing on in their studies at Elon. 

Internships are a popular way for students to both connect with a 
business or agency in their area of expertise and interest and also put 
their knowledge into practice. A staggering 84 percent of students 
complete internships, and this number can be accredited to the 
efficiency and approachability of the career center. 

Students can visit the career center to discuss how to become 
connected with the right organization, business or agenc)'. 
Students are never alone in pursuing their academic desires at Elon 
University. Students are able to find the right place and time for their 
internship using the helpful staff of the career center for guidance 
and by exploring the many resources available through the career 
services Web site. Any student wanting to pursue an internship is 
recommended to explore the Job and Internship search engines on 
the career services Web site first. 

The importance of internships to the core tenants on which 
the Elon Uni\'ersir)' education is based is shown in the mission 
statements of the school. Most relevant to internships, the university 
states its commitment to integrating learning across the disciplines 
by putting knowledge into practice. 

Elon seeks to prepare students to be global citizens and informed 
leaders while being moti\'ated by their concern for the common 
good. Internships provide an excellent way for Elon students to 
experience their learning hands on while becoming global, real- 
world participants in society. 



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ACADEMICS 



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WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 97 



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The learning communities here at Elon are places that 
students can live, learn and share a passion among other 
Elon students. Within these learning communities, 
students can experience an interest or major outside the 
classroom. They allow students to spend a school year thriving 
in an environment that they truly feel is home. 

There are more than 10 learning communities at Elon, 
dispersed all across campus. There are two that focus on majors 
- the Communications and Business learning communities - 
and ones that focus on either talents or interests, such as Fine 
Arts or Service. Students living in learning communities are 
able to take trips to specific places relevant to their LC. The 
Communications Learning Community, situated on the first 
floor of Sloan Hall, takes annual trips to Atlanta, Ga., and visits 
TV and radio stations. Every learning community on Elon's 
campus gives its students a feeling of comfort and welcoming 
when immersing themselves among other students who feel the 
same way about a certain passion. 

AVERY LUCAS / STAFF WRITER 




98 



ACADEMICS 









CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Students across campus 

participate in RecycleMania, like these ones living in 

the College Fellow Learning Community. These service 

learning community dwellers enjoy each other's company 

at a home football game. The foreign language learning 

community engages in a campus-wide mural contest. 

Following their community-based talent show, these 

neighbors pose for a group photo. The foreign language 

learning community. La Casa, learns new dance moves, 

taught by students during its Cuban Night. Photos 

courtesy of Jane Siegel. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



99 




Elon attracts students from all across tlie country and 
around the world. Ihe international community here 
at Hlon is impressive, with students Ironi countries 
ke South Africa, El Salvador, Italy, England and France. 
But what are the specific aspects of Elon that appeal to 
nternational students, as opposed to a college in their own 
countries? 

For some international students, the reasons for 
coming to the United States are the same as US students: 
the opportunities are great, the campus is beautiful or 
it has a desired major. But other than mundane reasons 
such as these, there are deep specific reasons why 
international students choose Elon rather than other 
universities. "I wanted the American college experience, 
one with a dorm room, dining halls and roommates," 
said Fiona Alfaro, the first student to come to Elon from 
El Salvador. "Also, the opportunities that an American 
education gives are much better than that of an El 
Salvadoran one." 

Like many teenagers going away to college, some 
international students simply want freedom. "For me 
coming to college in the States instead of Guatemala was 
to get freedom and be completely independent from my 
family," said Sofia Ibarra, a freshman from Guatemala. 
The reasons why international students leave their 
homeland to come to the US are numerous, showing 
Elon has a specific charm that draws students away from 
their homelands to live and learn in this community 
many miles away from home. 

AVERY LUCAS / STAFFWRITER 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Chris Spalding, 
Erjck Marin, Chris Jarret and Jose Molina attend an 
El Centro event. Marin poses with his home flag of 
Costa Rica. Senior James Bryant proudly displaces his 
British heritage with a friend. Bryant enjoys spending 
time with his friends Rob Slobodien and Garrett 
Jackson. Senior Sana Advani poses with an Indian 
airline crew on her flight from Elon to India. She 
jokingly poses with a cultural hat at dinner. Photos 
courtesy of Erick Marin, Sana Advani and James 
Bryant. 




WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 101 



Elon University has six academic programs specific to either 
majors or areas of interest to the student body. Fellows programs, 
such as the Communications and Business Fellows, are focused 
on specific majors and schools of Elon. Other programs like Leadership 
and Honors Fellows are not specific to any major and students can 
change their major as they please. 

Being a fellow gives a student specific opportunities that are not 
available to all students at Elon. Each fellow can live in major-specific 
learning communities, participate in paid research internships and 
receive a $1000 grant scholarship toward study abroad. Some fellows 
receive scholarships ranging from $2,500 to $10,000 a year. 

Students who are fellows feel a sense of belonging to the certain 



group because they are immediately introduced to a group with a 
common interest. 

"Fellows provides an instant family for all of us involved," said 
Lindsay Kimble, a member of the Leadership Fellows program. "I 
feel like I have so many more people to rely on in any situation. The 
opportunities provided to me on campus through Fellows have been 
numerous and truly shaped my experience at Elon." 

The Fellows Program gives students not only amazing opportunities 
but also a feeling of togetherness and community throughout their 
college career 

AVERY LUCAS / STAFF WRITER 



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Fellows pose for a 
shot outside of CNN's 
headquarters during 
their trip to Atlanta, 
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102 



ACADEMICS 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Thanks to 
the connections that Elon faculty and staff 
provide. Fellows were able to watch a live 
taping of CNN while on set. Students listen 
to advice at the Atlanta office of Weber 
Shandwick, an international public relations 
agency. Students saw the set of WSBTV. 
Freshman Greg Gentile poses at CNN. Editor 
of Atlanta Magazine Steve Fennessy talks 
with the Journalism Fellows. 



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104 ACADEMICS 



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Mi El Centfo:?" 
de Espanol 

El Centro de Espanol at Elon is a place for students and faculty members to further 
mcrease their knowledge of the Spanish language. Located on the first floor of the 
Carlton building, the staff at El Centro create a relaxed environment for everybody 
to enjoy learning about Spanish culture. They offer conversational "classes," where students, 
facult)' members and a teacher sit and converse for 45 minutes without any pressure about 
making a mistake. 

El Centro offers dozens of ways to help students e.xpand their knowledge of Spanish 
outside the classroom in a unique way. Students can bring their papers and get help with 
revision, bring in a Spanish movie to watch or just rela.x in their comfortable and welcoming 
environment. 

Elon has a positive incentive for getting students to spend time in El Centro. If students 
spend 130 documented hours or more studying, learning or rela.xing, Elon will reimburse 
students as much as $600 for a plane ticket to any Spanish-speaking country. With that as an 
reward for spending time in El Centro, students should feel excited and enthusiastic simply 
to go spend time in one of the many amenities Elon offers its students for engaged learning 
outside the classroom. 

AVERY LUCAS / STAFF WRITER 



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CLOCKWISE FROM 
TOP LEFT: Students 
learn about Mexico's 
culture through 
food and fellowship. 
This group enjoys a 
Mexican meal and 
each other's company. 
The El Centro de 
Espanol staff pose 
for a photo durng the 
fiesta outside Octagon. 
Photos courtesy 
of Raquel Cortes 
Mazuelas. 




WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 105 



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Political science students have made their 
mark in North Carolina. By helping 
conduct the Elon University Poll, students 
are helping legislators effectively update public 
policy in the state. 

"What's really interesting about our poll is that 
lawmakers all over North Carolina pay attention 
to our polls," said Mileah Kromer, assistant 
director of the Elon University Poll. "The results 
we get have really helped shape public policy. In 
a way, that makes them [the students] part of the 
policy process." 

Students conduct the Elon Poll by telephone. 
Corresponding computers randomly select phone 
numbers for the students to dial, which include 
both home and cell phone numbers. 

Registered pollsters undergo brief training 
before they begin their four-hour shift. In order 
to reach the most number of respondents, the 
poll usually runs from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday 
through Thursday. 

Kromer said she and poll director Hunter 
Bacot research potential topics for the poll in 
part by monitoring the legislative Web site for the 
North Carolina General Assembly. 

"We base our poll around different issues 
that are coming up for vote and things that are 
frequently discussed in political blogs," she said. 
"We try to really set the political agenda, but 
we do address issues that are discussed at the 
national level as well." 

Past topics for the poll include immigration, 
minimum wage, state lottery and toll roads in 
North Carolina. 

LESLEY COWIE / EDITOR IN CHIEF 





CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Sophomore Meagan Chieppor 
and senior Brandon Helton help with the Elon Poll as 
administrators. They monitor the sign-ups, making sure 
that all students registered have shown up. Students dial the 
telephone numbers that have been randomly selected for them. 
They select a number off the keyboard to show the computer 
system how the potential repondent has reacted. Senior Dan 
Browne strategically reads the poll questions off his computer 
screen. Students in Dr. Bacot's political science class create the 
questions for the poll based on successful studies of polls and 
human behavior. Students engage in friendly conversation with 
those who answer their telephones and try to persuade them 
to answer the Elon University Poll. 



106 



ACADEMICS 




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108 ACADEMICS 



the future of 

BROADWAY 




The number of new students accepted into the 
musical theater program at Elon last year was a 
mere 3 percent. After a long and tiring audition 
process, Ginna Claire Mason, a freshman with big 
dreams of making it to Broadway, was accepted into 
the program. The audition process which led to her 
ultimate acceptance into the program was rigorous and 
competitive, but Ginna's undying spirit and commitment 
drove her to success. 

Due to the competitive nature of musical theater 
programs, Ginna originally planned on auditioning at 
12 different universities, from New York University to 
Florida State University — but her first audition was at 
Elon in November of her senior year of high school. 
Even with so many options, Ginna immediately fell in 
love with Elon and realized by the end of her audition 
that she would definitely come to Elon if she got 
accepted into the program. 

Describing the e.xhausting audition process, Ginna 
recounts observing an acting class, performing a dance 
routine that was judged on warm-up, technique and 
across-the-floor combinations, delivering a one-minute 
monologue and singing two songs. One month after 
her audition, Ginna received the best call of her life, a 
call from Cathy McNeela, the director of the program 
at Elon, informing Ginna of her acceptance into the 
program. Because of her early acceptance to the musical 
theater program at Elon, Ginna cancelled all of her 
remaining auditions. 

Since arriving at Elon, Ginna, along with 17 other 
freshmen, has poured herself into musical theater, 
taking part in productions such as Collage, Broadway 
Cares and 1 10 in the Shade. Ginna plans on continuing 
working toward her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and 
attending the Southeastern Theater Conference to 
audition for casting directors in the spring of 2010. 

BLftIR MENZEL / STAFF WRITER 



CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: Senior Julianne 
Katz plays the flirtatious Lois in "Kiss Me, 
Kate." Seniors Courtney Markowitz and Johnny 
Stellard use physical comedy brilliantly to 
play the roles of Lilli Vanessi and Bill Calhoun. 
Gangsters played by senior Edward Schmit and 
sophomore Adam Kaplan filled the audience with 
uncontrollable laughs. A celebratory musical 
scene captures the liveliness of the cast. Photos 
by David Wells. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



109 



Dance 



with all your heart 



Spinning, twirling and sashaying through rigorous rehearsals is a typical 
day for Elon dance majors. With both the physical and mental dedication 
they put into their craft, being a dance major is one of the most strenuous 
studies at Elon. Although the program is small, it offers master classes taught 
by guest artists and great opportunities for students to choreograph, teach and 
participate in performances. 

This year the dance program hosted such programs as Choreography Salon, 
DanceWorks, Dancing in the Black Box and the annual tap dance performance, 
TAPPED OUT! 

"All of the faculty members create one-on-one relationships with students 
and are more than willing to help with anything they may need," said Rachael 
Fine, a senior dance major. 

Junior Erin Fitzgerald said her favorite part of being a dance major is 
performing, and she is grateful for all the opportunities the dance program has 
presented to her. 

RACHEL BERTONE / STAFF WRITER 



Most dance majors 
plan to look for 
careers in New 

York, Los Angeles, 

Chicago or on a 

cruise line. 




110 ACADEMICS 




CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Student dancers and faculty choreographers perform on the Black Box stage Nov. 
12-14. Senior Rachael Fine gracefully slides toward the floor during her routine. Sophomore dance major Jessica 
Duffy uses dance to express herself. Sophomore and junior dance majors showcased their skills in the annual 
Choreography Salon, which explored the importance of movement in dance on Oct. 22 and 23. Photos by Cyntra 
Brown and Lindsay Fendt. 






CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: 
Ahmed Fadaam completes 
his "Civilization" structure, 
a work he's been crafting 
since fall of 2008. Senior art 
student Monica Huang spins 
the ceramics wheel to shape 
her creation, in a multi-step 
process that includes clay 
throwing, wheel spinning 
and pottery scraping. Mark 
Capozzola proudly displays 
his first-place art piece in 
the student juried "Hot Air" 
exhibit for his photograph 
"Car Ride." Photos by Lauren 
Ramsdell and Tom Arcaro. 



112 ACADEMICS 







Students pursuing study in the visual arts participate in challenging studio-intensive courses to improve technique as 
well as develop character and critical thought as contemporary engaged artists. Each year, the art department features 
a number of exhibits giving interested students the opportunity to submit work, help install, interact or curate. 

This fall, the art department hosted wonderful outside talent from the surrounding area. Guest artist Mariam Aziza 
Stephan came to Elon to speak about her paintings (featured in the Isabella Cannon Room) and participate in a question- 
and-answer session open to all students. 

More than 300 works of art from all across the country were exhibited in the Ward Gallery of Arts West during the 
Small Works Invitational. The Tri-State Sculpture exhibit brought art work to different parts of campus, causing the entire 
university to engage with the pieces thoughtfully. 

During International Education week, the installation of Ahmed Fadaam's "Civilization" statue took place outside the art 
building. Additionally, each semester the art department hosts a series of art history lectures bringing scholars from across 
the nation like Rebecca Brown who spoke about her new work on India's contemporary artists. 

The creativity and passion of artists at Elon is exhibited at none other than the annual Student Juried Works exhibition, 
put on by the senior Professional Practices class. This year the show "Hot Air" exhibited around 60 student works of art. 

"This year's show featured two large-scale installations that extended out of the gallery space, begging viewers to interact 
with the art," said Will Rusch, a senior painting major. 

This year truly provided many memorable and wonderful opportunities and cultural events for students. 

ERIN DAY / CONTRIBUTOR 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



113 



^ 



114 ACADEMICS 



Sophmore Liz 
Passannante perform 
a solo. Photos 
courtesy of The 
Pendulum. 



Twisted 



easure 



With the smooth mixture of male and female voices 
cox'cring some of today's most popular songs, Elon's 
co-ed a capella group Twisted Measure rocks the 
music scene on campus. 

The ensemble was busy this year initiating four new male 
members and participating in multiple events both on and ort 
campus. They were featured in Acapalooza and Midnight Meals 
and took a trip to Duke University for the annual a capella 
workshop, Solam. The group even traveled to Washington, D.C., 
to sing with other groups from the area during Fall Break. 

"The family dynamic we have really helps us deliver great 
performances and work together etiectively," said Emily 
Mooney, who has been a Twisted Measure member for the last 
three years. 

The group is eager to begin working on new songs for the 
ne.xt year, and judging by the frequently sold-out concerts, Elon 
students are excited to hear them. 

RACHEL BERTONE / STAFF WRITER 



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FROM TOP TO BOTTOM: Junior Will Armour is 
expressive and focused during his solo. The group 
performs in Yeager Recital Hall. Senior Stephanie Lane is 
featured in this song. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



15 




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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Members of Rip Chord pei 
performance to make for a more entertaining act. Junior Bi 
Chord concert. The ladies of Sweet Signatures perform for 
them of their musical options on campus. Senior Kate Ausi 
Chris Beeson's song called for a female partner. A capella 
synchronize their harmonies to correctly perform their soi 



orm at Mi^^^^^^Qphe singe 

ett Harman puts his all into one of his solos at the Rip_ 
\ classroom of students in order to entertain and inform 
in makes a special cameo in one of Rip_Chord's songs, 
usic is truly a team activity; the men of Rip_Chord must 
gs. Photos courtesy of The Pendulum. 



116 



ACADEMICS 





Eloii has many organizations 
that offer students outlets to 
express their talents. Same-sex 
a cappella groups Rip_Chord and 
Sweet Signatures use strong voices and 
talent to perform for audiences. Their 
weekly practices pay off when they 
perform at events such as Midnight 
Meals for other Elon students and 
fans. 

Sweet Signatures, the all-female 
a cappella group, consists of 
approximately 18 girls, and welcomed 
seven new members this year The 
group practices every Monday, 
Thursday and Sunday for two hours. 
The hard work pays off, as it results in 
a stronger and more bonded group. 
Sweet Signatures was one of six a 
cappella groups to get into Solam, a 
weekend-long competition hosted 
by Duke University's Out of the Blue. 



Sweet Signatures is one of two all- 
female a cappella groups to make it 
into the competition this year, and is a 
big accomplishment for all the girls. 

This year, Sweet Signatures 
recorded a CD and hosted 
ACAPPALLOOZA, an a cappella 
festival where various groups from 
a myriad of colleges performed. The 
unity that Sweet Sigs has within the 
group is like no other. "As a freshman 
coming to Elon and not really 
knowing my place. Sweet Sigs became 
an immediate family. The girls are 
all so welcoming and we always have 
the best times together," newcomer 
Keagan Gros said. Sweet Signatures is 
not just a group of talented girls, but 
a family that shares much more than 
just the ability to sing. 

AVERY LUCAS / STAFF WRITER 



Signatures 



«i 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 






Carolinas 



E Ion's marching band, called The Fire of the Carolinas, was 
founded in 2001. The previous group. Show Band of the 
Carolinas, drove school spirit from the years 1962 to 1982. 
Despite being a young marching band. The Fire of the Carolinas is 
a large community of students from more than 30 different majors 
coming together to bring Phoeni.x pride and spirit. 

Heather Babb, a mellophone player who has been a marching 
band member for two years, describes The Fire of the Carolinas as a 
close communit)'. 

"We're not only a marching band, but a marching family," she said. 
"It's a blast to spend so much time with people I have learned to love 
and appreciate in different ways." 

Just as her band mates have become her brothers and sisters, so 
has the director become a positive mentor. 

"T-Saw (Dr Sa^vyer) makes the band what it is. His uplifting 
attitude and jovial personality make it impossible not to smile on the 
field," Heather said. 

Being a member of The Fire of the Carolinas is no smaU 
commitment. Members practice three days a week for about two 
hours each practice, attend a band camp prior to classes each fall and 
perform at 6-8 football games a season. 



BLAIR MENZEL/ STAFF WRITER 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The Fire of the Carolinas 
members bow their heads during the invocation of the 
football game. Freshman Crista O'Neal of the color guard 
tosses her flag during a pre-season practice. Band members 
cheer on the Phoenix from the stands. The band parades 
toward Rhodes Stadium before the game. Photos by Corey 
Groom and Ashley Barnas. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



19 



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120 



ACADEMICS 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The Pep Band poses 
for a group photo. The Wind Ensemble performs a 
piece on stage during one of their campus concerts. 
Members of the Pep Band work together to produce 
quality sound. They perform at the basketball games 
in order to motivate the players and the crowd. 
Photos courtesy of Tony Sawyer. 



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Pep 
Band! 



The Pep Band always knows the tunes to play 
to get the fans excited and enthusiastic at all 
men's and women's home basketball games. 
Most members of the pep band also participate in 
the marching band and have experience playing their 
drums, woodwind or brass instrument, or bass guitar. 
Membership is based on seasonal auditions, which are 
held in November. 

Tony Sawyer is the director of bands and Pep 
Band director. In addition to his teaching, Tony is a 
freelance orchestral percussionist and jazz and pop 
drum set artist. Tony has performed all across the 
Southeast, has recorded with local artists and has 
recorded for the Public Broadcasting Service. As part 
of the Pep Band, members get the chance to learn 
from an experienced facult)- member in addition to 
making friends within the group. 

School pride is very important at Elon University, 
and the Pep Band plays an integral role in building 
this positive spirit. In addition, the Pep Band allows 
music majors the chance to perform beginning their 
freshman year. There are numerous opportunities for 
musicians at Elon to perform with a group, including 
Fire of the Carolinas, elan. Electric Ensemble and 
Chorale, among other groups. Musicians at Elon 
can show their school spirit while developing their 
musicianship through the Pep Band. 

JANE SIEGEL / ACADEMICS SECTION EDITOR 



9 




WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 121 




The academic advising department helps students discover their passion and potential. Students have 
the opportunit)' to enroll in a one-credit course called "Exploring Careers and Majors," in which they 
examine their interests, talents and goals as they relate to the future. Rebecca Olive-Taylor led the 
course this year, guiding students through their various options. 

In this class, students completed a series of evaluations in order to further understand hov^' their hobbies 
and interests influenced their academic decisions. One popular example is the Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator, 
which helps students understand their academic and lifestyle preferences. These preferences play a role in 
helping students decide on a major and career. 

Students developed tentative four-year plans to determine when they would study abroad, seek 
internships and take required courses to meet a desired degree. Creating a concrete plan helps many of the 
students in this class to get a better idea of what major they would like to pursue. 

Students hesitant about declaring a major are not alone. Elon University provides many professional 
resources to help students stay on track with the pursuit of their goals. Students who utilize the career center, 
academic advising and transition courses like "Exploring Careers and Majors" will benefit by declaring a 
major in a conscious and thoughtful manner. 

JANE SIEGEL / ACADEMICS SECTION EDITOR 




122 



ACADEMICS 




ademic 



Advising 



CAREER SERVICES 
Compulingjcience^ 
Mathematics _ 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: This student browses the various 
academic brochures in order to help her determine which 
concentration she would like to pursue. Duke is home to the 
Academic Advising department, a place where students may 
get their resumes critiqued or to get advice about their futures. 
Lorie Gaines welcomes students to the Academic Advising area 
and directs them to helpful resources. Rebecca Olive-Taylor's 
folder for her COE I 1 0: Exploring Majors course is thicker than 
all the other folders on her desk, as she holds many resources to 
assisting students in their academic decisions. Photo courtesy of 
Jane Siegel and Rebecca Olive-Taylor. 





WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 123 




CLOCKWISE FROM TOPXEFTt-By stUaying ^ 
abroad, Elon students get to expeiierrce-different 
cultures and livelihoods. Many students get a - 
thrill from being able to say that they have stood 
before-famous landmarks abroad.'^hecF NtSi%hcut 

enthusiastically poses in front of a telephone 

.J>ooth in London. For the first timeln Elon 
history, students who were accepted into their - 
study abroad programs were required to attemU 
weekly meetings-and discussions pertaining-to 
their trip. Photos courtesy of Shea Northciit andT' 
The Penrdulum. ^ ~ 



■3- 



124 



ACADEMICS 



1.1, 

I 



Seventy-one percent ot. students at Elon University 
study abroad at least once before graduation. Junior 
Shea Northcut did not want to miss her chance. This 
l.ill. Shea traveled to London, 1-ngland where she studied 
abroad tor a semester. 

Shea chose London because it is one ot three Hlon 
Center Abroad Programs. These programs are different 
from Eton's atfihate and e.xchange programs. In Elon's 
Center Abroad Programs, Elon has secured .student housing, 
located facilities for classes and hired local faculty abroad to 
teach courses. 

Shea felt comfortable traveling abroad knowing this 
program was administered by Elon and included faculty 
from home. But she also en|o\ed the basic history course 
and literature courses she took in London. 

"We read different pieces of literature and saw plays every 
week. I love pla\'s so that was great," Shea said. 

Students studying abroad in London also have the 
opportunity to complete an internship. As a Broadcast & 
New Media major. Shea was looking for an internship in 
the broadcast field. While interning with Global Radio 
News, a freelance agency for breaking news, Shea had the 
opportunity to meet broadcasters from across the globe. 

Though she attended classes and held an internship 
in London, Shea's favorite aspect of studying abroad was 
traveling. She visited sights in England like Bath and 
Stonehenge. Also, she and friends planned trips to France, 
Italy, Spain and Morocco. 

Most of all, Shea appreciates the personal growth 
she experienced while studying abroad. "I know I grew 
as a person while there," Shea said. "You're seeing and 
e.xperiencing new things on a daily basis. It is a great 
opportunity I think all students should have whether it's in 
London or elsewhere." 

DAWN PETERSON / CONTRIBUTOR 




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It's a weird feeling to be in a place where you don't speak the predominant language and to knov 
everyone is staring at you and taking pictures because of your hair color. It's weird to look 
around and not see a single person brought up in the same cultural environment as yourself. 
But it's a feeling I wouldn't trade. 

From climbing the Great Wall outside of Beijing to cuddling a panda in Chengdu to climbing th 
stairs of the Dalai Lama's winter palace in Tibet, going to China for Winter Term provided me with 
memories that I would not have the opportunity to gain otherwise. The three weeks of Winter Tern 
was the perfect amount of time, too, as it was enough to get a taste of the uniqueness of the countr) 
but not so long as to grow weary of the chopstick-only meals or the lack of United States-quality 
commodities. Spending January in China was one of the best experiences I have ever had, and I 
would highly recommend studying abroad to everyone! 

LAUREN NEEDELL / LIFE SECTION EDITOR 




126 ACADEMICS 



» . \ « 




I , 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The freshman Business Fellows post at Chlchenitza. Elon students studying abroad in China happily 
wear traditional garb. Kelly Cavanuagh, a freshman business fellow, smiles with native children in the village of Tinum. Brian Serow 
and sophomore Lauren Needell get the rare opportunity to pose with a panda. Elon students excitedly take in ail the sights that 
China has to offer. Three students pose at the foot of the Great Wall of China. Photos by Lauren Needell and David Campbell. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



127 



Spring Study 



Abroad 



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128 ACADEMICS 



ne of the greatest experiences that Elon has to offer is 
the study abroad program. The majority of students take 
advantage of the incredible opportunity to spend winter 
term or a whole semester living and learning in another country. 
Students that decided to go abroad for spring semester this year 
were shipped otT after winter term and have been expanding their 
horizons across the globe. 

Elon offers different t)'pes of study abroad programs, including 
Elon Centre abroad programs, which are programs Elon has 
developed; affiliate programs, where students are sent through 
another university or agency; and exchange programs, where an 
Elon student is welcomed at another university and a student from 
that school comes to Elon. Some of the most popular programs for 



the spring semester arc Elon in London and Elon in Florence, as 

well as Australia, Cosia Rica and Scotland. 

Jo Beth Stoddard, a junior strategic communications major, 
decided to study abroad in London this spring. She said that 
one factor that helped her make her decision was the intern.ship 
program that was offered for communications majors. She was 
also excited that London was in Europe and that she would have 
the chance to travel around the continent. )o Beth said the trip 
was out of her comfort zone, but she has no regrets. "It has been 
hands-down the best experience of my life!" she said. 



RACHEL BERTONE / STAFF WRITER 





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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Julia Smith captures the 
wintry beauty of Denmark, as she looks upon New Haven 
Harbor. Not only do students who study abroad get to enjoy 
the beauty of their destinations, but in some cases, they 
get to experience life-changing tragedy; the steeple of this 
church endures the aftermath of the devastating earthquake 
in Chile. Junior Roger Black takes in the contrasting scenery 
in Australia, while juniors Amanda Kennedy and Merrill Ward 
proudly stand in front of the famous Edinburgh Castle in 
Edinburgh, Scotland. Both Amanda and Merrill are spending 
their spring semester studying at the University of St. 
Andrews. Photos courtesy of Julia Smith, Lindsay Fendt, 
Roger Black and Merrill Ward. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



129 



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130 ACADEMICS 



Alternative 

Spring Break 

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ABOVE: Seniors Tristan Milder and David Magida, juniors Sydnie Krause and Ron Yardenay, sophomores Olivia 
Feldman and Cassie Taylor and freshmen Eva Yaffa and Melissa Kansky celebrate their last day of service in Buenos 
Aires, Argentina, with Elon Hillel Director Nancy Luberoff. Photos courtesy of Nancy Luberoff and Tristan Milder. 



Every year around the end of March, most Elon students 
gather their beach towels, bathing suits and sunscreen for 
the one week ot relaxation after suffering through grueling 
midterms; spring break! But while many students are vacationing 
on far-away beaches, some choose to spend their time off helping 
others. 

Through the Elon Kernodle Center for Service Learning, 
students can choose to go on an alternative spring break trip 
where they spend time rebuilding houses, working with children 
and helping victims of natural disasters. There are multiple 
locations offered in the United States and abroad, including 



Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, Argentina, Mississippi and 
South Carolina. 

Sophomore Emily Neidhardt traveled to Treasure Beach, 
Jamaica, over spring break. She said she wanted to do something 
worthwhile with her time and described the experience as an 
eye-opener to how fortunate she is. The group spent the week 
at an elementary school on the island, playing and teaching the 
kids, as well as building them a new playground. "It was great 
experience and a good mLx of relaxation and hard work. I would 
definitely do it again!" Emily said. 

RACHEL BERTONE / STAFF WRITER 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



131 



1 32 WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



Playing the Field 




ost athletes at Elon can trace back 
to the first time they stepped onto a 
.field or court. They can map out the 
journey they traveled to get to where they are 
in athletics today, and all of them would agree 
that it took hard work and an undying passion 
for the game. 

Athletics at Elon provide athletes with a 
continuation of that journey, whether that 
is playing a varsity, club or intramural sport. 
Athletes' drives come from a passion to play 
their best every time they play— whether in 
practice or in games. When they step on that 
field or court, they put their all into what they 
are doing, leaving it all in the game. 

But there is more to athletics than just 
playing the game. A sports team is like a 
family; they do not just play together. They 
spend time with each other, creating some of 
the closest friendships they will have in college. 
When the Elon Phoenix athletes graduate, they 
leave with the same hard work and passion they 
came here with, as well as close friends in tow 
to share in the rest of their journeys. I 

MEGANWANNER/ SPORTS SECTION EDITOR 






WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 






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Davidson 



Presbyterian 



Won, 58-0 
Won, 4 1 -7 
Lost, 35-7 



Georgia Southern Won, 28- 1 4 



Furman 



The Citadel 



Chattanooga 



Wofford 



Won, 19-12 

Won, 43-7 

Won, 45-10 



Won, 34-6 



Western Carolina Won, 42- 1 7 
Appalachian State Lost, 10-7 



Samford 



Richmond 



Won, 27-7 
Lost, 16-13 



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SPORTS 



Ml|t> 



-Team 

Roster 




lanial Shuman 

Brandon Nevvsome 

Aaron Mellette 

Lance Camp 

Ronnie Hardison 

Blake Thompson 

Donny Kirby 

Zach Henderson 

Sean JefFcoat 

Dale Riley 

Darrius McQueen 

Thomas Wilson 

Shay Newcomer 

David Williams 

Chris Shafto 

Scott Riddle 

Luke Martin 

Jeremy Peterson 

Terrell Hudgins 

Cameron McGlenn 

Karlos Sullivan 

Vincent Pompliano 

Bruce Rosell 

Alex Encarnacion 

Quinton Lightfoot 

Brett McQuilkin 

Terrell Wilson 

Dave Goltz 

lohn Reece 

Jared Thompson 

Dontay Taylor 

Andy Leffler 



Adam Shreiner 

A.). Harris 

Brandon Spurlock 

Jake Goldsberry 

Drew Turner 

lonathaii Conner 

Ihonda Taylor 

Andrew Straus 

Matt Eastman 

Nolan Ward 

Lionel Shoffner 

Brandon Wiggins 

Tony Thompson 

Jordan Daniel 

Travis Greene 

Elliott Richardson 

Walker White 

Joshua Jones 

Chris Werden 

Chris Homsy 

Tyler Zoda 

Jeff Allen 

Khirey Walker 

Mark Hoffer 

Logan Hardin 

Khiry MuUins 

Jordan Jones 

Eric Ludwig 

Jarrod Gant 

Kyle Herbert 

Brad Lind 

Rodney Austin 



lohn Rubcrtone 

Andrew McMicken 

Clay Johnson 

David Harrison 

Mark Rehbein 

Dennis Wagner 

John Watts 

Sean Sullivan 

Dave McClain 

Matt Williamson 

Ned Cuthbertson 

Corey O'Shea 

Justin Ward 

Michael Copenhaver 

Rsaun Rorie 

Gavin Billings 

Chris Harris 

Kenton Beal 

Taylor Berry 

Matt Leddy 

Andre Labinowicz 

Clark Richards 

Olufemi Lamikanra 

Brandon Ward 

Joey Hall 

Jordan Gibson 

Rushaun Byrd 

Andre Campbell 

Eric Carstens 

Brandon Brant 

David Hunt 

Jay Brown 




CLOCKWISE 
FROM TOP LEFT: 
Sophomore 
running back A.J. 
Harris pushes 
through the 
Citadel's defense 
during the Oct. 
10 match -up. 
Sophomore Jamal 
Shuman runs 
past the Citadel 
player toward the 
Elon goal. With 
four wins under 
its belt, the Elon 
team pairs up 
against the Citadel 
for another 
victory. Photos by 
Corey Groom and 
Mollie Hunter. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 





SPORTS 



I M 




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Co-Ed & 
All-Female 

Team Roster 




CLOCKWISE 
FROM TOP LEFT: 
The football 
cheerleaders stand 
tall and proud 
before crowds of 
as many as 1 3,000. 
Senior Stephanie 
Hicks rallies the 
crowd with her 
smile and spirit. 
The cheerleaders 
encourage spirit by 
leading the crowd 
in chants. Freshman 
Caroline Scalici 
and sophomore 
Sarah Daniels thrill 
the Phoenix fans 
with high-flying 
arabesques. Photos 
by David Wells. 



James Connolly 

Hilary Fogle 

Stephanie Hicks 

Chelsey McGinnis 

Rachel Sterling 

Brian Stevenson 

Hampton Thomas 

Jasmine Whaley 

Elizabeth Balazs 

Alix Barnes 

Sarah Daniels 



Allison l.event 

Amanda Locke 

Kristen Lueck 

Melanie I.utz 

Liza Mcintosh 

Crystal Moyer 

Kelsey Norkett 

Jenny Rossbach 

Caroline Scalici 

Jenna Strucko 

Lauren Van Fleet 

Allison Wacie 





WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



■:S&^*. 



5&« 






'e»si\ 




140 SPORTS 



.-'."n..* 




Dance Te am 
Roster 



Lauren Bovven 

Anna Decker 

)amie Lee Devantier 

Kristin Genszler 

Liz Harrington 

Alexandra Hojnacki 

Mollie Hughes 

Jennifer Kennedy 

Mariah Coster 



Mallory Lane 

Danielle LeBlanc 

Michelle Murphy 

Stephanie Quinn 

lennifcr Shipowitz 

Catherine Siegel 

Sadie StatTord 

Kelsey Thompson 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The Flames join the 
Fire of the Carolinas in cheering on the Phoenix football 
team. The Flames show off their high kicks. Jamie Lee 
DeVantier puts her pom-poms together to clap for 
the team as they come off the field. The Elon Dance 
Team dances in the halftime show with the Fire of the 
Carolinas. Photos by Corey Groom and David Wells. 



II 
■ 





WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 1 4 1 




Temple 
High Point 



Coastal Carolina 



NC State 



UNC Asheville 



Tied, 0-0 (2 OT) 
Lost, 0-1 
Won, i-0 
Won, 1-0 
Lost, 0-2 
Won, 2-1 



Jacksonville State Won, 2- 1 (OT) 



Wofford 



Furman 



Georgia Southern 



Davidson 



Won, 2- 1 

Won, 2- 1 (OT) 

Won, 1-0 

Lost, 0-2 



Appalachian State Tied, 0-0 



Western Carolina 



Greensboro 



Chattanooga 



Samford 



The Citadel 



Won, 1-0 
Won, 4- 1 
Won, 5- 1 
Lost, 0- 1 



Won, 2- 1 



College of Charleston Won, 2-0 



UNC Greensboro 



Lost, 0-1 




142 SPORTS 






Te^m 

er 



Rost< 




Shannon Cosgrove 

Kristen Haney 

Sydney Little 

Megan Deutschle 

Alix Heinicke 

Amanda Jones 

Alanna VVinsper 

Laura Norwind 

Scarlett Fakhar 

Claire O'Keefe 



Molly Calpin 

Meghan Braun 

Emily Brenner 

Nikki Heilman 

Caroline McKinlcy 

Brittany Hallberg 

Michelle Pullen 

Maria Maturo 

Kyle Waggoner 

Elizabeth Palmer 



Morgan Wallace 

Andrea Keller 

Noell McCain 

Lauren Griffith 

C'arolina Klara 

Andrea Brooke 

Lindsey Nusdeo 

Courtney Scltman 

Shannon Foley 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The 
women's soccer team gets ready to 
take the field after halftime. Junior 
Megan Deutschle happily passes the 
ball to a teammate. Junior Brittany 
Hallberg attempts to block Tanya 
Cain, a sophomore at NC State, 
and pass the ball to a teammate. 
Freshman Emily Brenner chases 
after NC State's Jordan Edwards to 
gain possession of the ball. Photos 
by Corey Groom and David Wells. 





WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



High Point 



Charlotte 



Lost, 0- 1 
Lost, 2- i 






II 




* 



Longwood 



Marshall 



Clemson 



Tied, 0-0 (2 OT) 
Won, 2-0 



Won, 2-0 



East Tennessee State Won, 3-0 



Wake Forest 



Lost, 1-2 
Lost, 1-2 



Appalachian State Won, I -0 

College of Charleston Won, I -0 



Davidson 



West Virginia 



Wofford 



Furman 



Winthrop 



Radford 



Won, 2- 1 (OT) 
Tied, I -I 
Lost, 0-2 
Lost, 2-3 
Won, 4-0 
Won, 2-0 
Lost, i-2 
Won, 1-0 



UNC Greensboro 



College of Charleston Won, 2-0 
(SoCon Tournament) 

Wofford Lost, 0-2 

(SoCon Tournament) 




144 SPORTS 



Team 
er 



Rosti 




Reed [lillard 

Chat Ott 

Clint Irwin 

Mark Berlin 

Nicholas Butterly 

Ben Lunka 

Clint Collins 

Stephen Miller 

Brad Franks 

James Carroll 



Denzel Ogunyase 

Erfan Imeni 

Daniel Street 

Drew Gardner 

Stephen Dilger 

Jahan Threeths 

lustin Wyatt 

Greg Mader 

Austen King 

Steven Kinney 



Chris Thomas 

Hunter Miller 

Morgan Fleming 

Gabe Latique 

Orry Powers 

Tony Pusateri 

Archi Karpeh 

Jordan Neuhauser 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Senior Daniel Street, of Charlotte, NC, faces off 
against Nathan Mathers, of UNC Charlotte. Hoping defender Isaac Cowles of 
UNC Charlotte does not interfere, freshman Chris Thomas prepares to retrieve 
the ball passed from his teammate. Senior Orry Powers runs toward the Elon 
ball. Photos by Heather Cassano. 




WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



•^-"-;r 



South Carolina State Won, 3-0 
UNC Wilmington Won, 3-0 



UNC Asheville 



Won, 3-1 



North Carolina Central Won, 3-0 



Charlotte 



Howard 



Won, 3-0 
Won, 3- 1 



/ 



East Tennessee State Won, 3-2 



Liberty 
High Point 



Radford 



Norfolk State 



Georgia State 



Won, 3-1 
Won, 3-0 
Won, 3-0 
Won, 3-0 
Lost, 2-3 
Won, 3-0 



)m 



Chattanooga 



Samford 



Western Carolina 



UNC Greensboro 



Furman 



Georgia Southern 



Davidson 



Won, 3-2 
Lost, 2-3 



Appalachian State Won, 3-0 



Won, 3-0 
Lost, 2-3 
Lost, 0-3 
Won, 3-0 



Won, 3-0 



Winston-Salem State Won, 3-0 



The Citadel 



Won, 3-0 



College of Charleston Lost, 2-3 



Samford 



Chattanooga 



UNC Greensboro 



Wofford 



Won, 3-0 
Won, 3-1 
Lost, 2-3 
Won, 3-0 



North Carolina A&T Won, 3- 1 
Appalachian State Lost, 2-3 



Western Carolina 



Lost, 2-3 




146 SPORTS 



M 



earn 
oster 



Melissa Zidar 
Ali Deatsch 
Celia Eddy 
Sarah Schemerhorn 
Lauren Copenhagen 
Megan McMahon 
Carohne Lemke 
Hniih' Regan 



Ally Nogi 
Traci Stewart 
Carly Lcdbetter 
Mandy Wilson 
Allison lohnson 
Lizzie West 
Jessica Barrow 




CLOCKWISE FROM TOP 
LEFT: The Phoenix team 
breaks at the offset of the 
game. Preparing to serve, 
junior Lauren Copenhagen 
tosses the volleyball in the 
air. Copenhagen spikes the 
volleyball over the net, with 
her teammates prepared 
for the returning passes. 
Stretching toward the ball, 
senior Emily Regan makes 
a pivotal move in the game. 
Photos by Alex Litoff and 
Lindsay Fendt. 



1 

1 









^ 

t 




ll 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



Hen's Cross Country 

Elon Invitational I 

Winthrop Invitational > 

Louisville Classic 26/ 

Blue Ridge Open 8/ 

Southern Conference 5/ 
Championship 

NCAA Regional 20/ 



Women's Cross Country 

NCAA Regional 20/35 

Elon Invitational 2/10 

Winthrop Invitational 3/8 

Louisville Classic 15/34 

Blue Ridge Open 6/ 1 5 

Southern Conference 2/12 
Championship 

NCAA Regional 20/35 




SPORTS 



V 



en's ^ Women 's 

Team Roster 



t>-'- 



Glen Coriifll 


Lucas Walters 


Sarah McKenna 


Tim Garber 


David Wells 


Katelyn O'Dunne 


Andrew Garrison 


Taylor Zorski 


Christine Pacewicz 


Justin Gianni 


laqueline Alnes 


Sullivan Parkes 


Ranley Gousse 


Caitlin Bceler 


Melissa Provost 


Andrew Hawkey 


Katy Burns 


Melanie Reyer 


Sean Marlyn 


Meaghan Collins 


Catherine Rossi 


Connor Mercuric 


Allyson Costa 


Justine Schulcrud 


Conor O'Brien 


Morgan Dcnecke 


Emily Tryon 


Matthew Richardson 


Emilv Fournier 


Courtney Whalen 


Clay Sankey 


Lauren Fredrickson 




WiU Schefer 


Stephanie Giunta 





CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: As the 
gun fires, 1 2 teams take off to compete 
for the SoCon Women's Cross Country 
Championship. The championship was 
hosted by Elon University on October 
3 1 , 2009. Junior Justin Gianni, freshman 
Sullivan Parkes and sophomore Will 
Schefer race to the finish line. Photos by 
Sam Warren and David Wells. 





I 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



Lipscomb 

Charlotte 

Coastal Carolina 

Fairleigh Dickson- Florham 

Hofstra 

Yale 

UNC Wilmington 

Samford 

Chattanooga 

Wake Forest 

NC State 

Ohio 

Navy 

Furman 

Wofford 

Appalachian State 

Western Carolina 

Samford 

Chattanooga 

UNC Greensboro 

Wofford 

Furman 

Western Carolina 

College of Charleston 

The Citadel 

UNC Greensboro 

Gardner-Webb 

Appalachian State 

Georgia Southern 

Davidson 

No. 3 Davidson 

No. 2 Western ( 



Won, 91-86 
Lost, 61-75 
Lost, 46-69 

Won, 102-68 
Lost, 46-70 
Lost, 65-69 
Lost, 56-86 
Lost, 31-55 
Won, 82-63 
Lost, 50-90 
Lost, 76-79 
Lost, 59-71 
Lost, 73-79 
Lost, 53-48 
Lost, 55-72 
Lost, 65-89 
Lost, 81-83 
Lost, 49-50 
Won, 83-80 
Lost, 55-62 
Lost, 56-72 
Won, 66-55 
Won, 81-76 
Lost, 77-80 
Lost, 77-72 
Won, 70-65 
Won, 84-79 
Lost, 54-58 
Lost, 88-98 
Lost, 96-99 

, Won, 66-59 
<Lost, 57-68 




SPORTS 



^ « 



Team 

er 



Rosti 



«&. 




Adam Constantine 

Josh Bonney 

Drew Spradlin 

Terrance Birdette 

Brett Ervin 

Devan Carter 

John Moody 

Aaron Smith 



Ion Ogolo 
Roger Dugas 
Daniel Watts 
David Meyer 
Scott Grable 
TJ Douglas 
Chris Long 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Junior Chris Long looi<s for 
an open player so he can pass the pal! to victory. The men's 
basketball team gets together for a group shot. Senior Adam 
Constantine leaps for the hoop. Head coach Matt Matheny 
provides inspiration and instruction during a time-out. Photos 
courtesy of Molly Carey, David Wells and The Pendulum. 





I 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 1 5 1 



Youngstown State 

Navy 

St. Andrews 

Virginia Tech 

Manhattan College 

Georgia Southern 

College of Charleston 

Winston-Salem State 

Chattanooga 

Samford 

UNC Asheville 

Coastal Carolina 

Appalachian State 

•*avidson 

festern Carolina 
UNC Greensboro 
Furman 
Wofford 

Georgia Southern 
College of Charleston 
Southern Virginia 
Chattanooga 
Samford 

Appalachian State 
Davidson 
Western Carolina 
Furman 
Wofford 

UNC Greensboro 
No. 7 seed Wofford 
No. 2 Samford 



Won, 86-66 
Lost, 68-61 
Won, 104-27 
Lost, 82-46 
Lost, 83-67 
Lost, 70-58 
Lost, 63-50 

Won, 71-59 

Won, 74-66 
Lost, 72-63 

Won, 73-68 
Lost, 61-49 
Lost, 85-66 
Lost, 82-73 

Won, 59-54 
Lost, 84-70 

Won, 63-61 
Lost, 61-60 
Lost, 7 1 -66 
Lost, 64-57 

Won, 83-32 
Lost, 83-64 

Won, 60-59 
Lost, 73-54 

Won, 77-63 
Lost, 75-48 

Won, 58-55 
Lost, 69-64 
Lost, 77-71 

Won, 67-53 
Lost, 57-38 



SPORTS 



^.« 



««s 






'4P^' 



Te 




Rosti 



m 

;er 



Kelsey Evans 

lermile' Batten 

Kallie Hovattcr 

Courtney Medley 

Aiesha Harper 

Ali Ford 

Tiara Cause 

Julie Taylor 

Titl'any Davis 



Erica Keto 

Amber Wall 

Jess Luedtke 

Urysla Cotton 

Lei Lei Hairston 

Lisa Archie 

Gabby Oloye 

Arayael Brandner 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Senior Urysla Cotton goes for 
a free throw shot. Freshman Kelsey Evans concentrates and 
visualizes the ball landing in the hoop. Urysla takes a deep 
breath before making her shot. Sophomore Courtney Medley 
throws her hands up as she attempts to block the other 
player. Photos courtesy of The Pendulum. 




WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 1 53 



c o 



* 



Springhiir Suites 
Intercollegiate 

Springhiii Suites 
Intercollegiate 

Sea Trails 
Intercollegiate 

Sea Trails 
intercollegiate 

Sea Trails 
Intercollegiate 

Davidson College 
Invitational 

Davidson College 
Invitational 

Mizuno Savannah 
Intercollegiate 

Mizuno Savannah 
Intercollegiate 

ODU/Seascape 
Invitational 

ODU/Seascape 
Invitational 

The Hummingbird 
Intercollegiate 

The Hummingbird 
Intercollegiate 



9th/ 1 6 



T5th/I6 



9th/ 1 6 



1 2th/ 1 6 



T6th/I6 



9th/ 1 2 



9th/ 1 2 



TlOth/IS 



llth/15 



1 0th/ 1 4 



i 2th/ I 4 



Tl5th/I8 



T9th/I8 




,<^- 




LEFT: Randall Andersen scopes out the angle for his next putt. 
RIGHT: Stephen Dressel follows through on his shot. Photos 
courtesy of Megan Donald. 



* 



SPORTS 



Rost< 



m 

er 



Randall Andersen 

Phil Bartholomew 

Stephen Dressel 

Kenneth Ezell 

Mike Fekete 

Josh Goldstein 

Scott Hockeme)er 

Jayson Judy 



Caleb Luther 

Alex l.uxenburg 

James Mahoney 

Tanner Norton 

Miller Robins 

John Somers 

Chris Stegemann 

Craig Wood 



I 




itf-* 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



Great Smokies 
Intercollegiate 



T I St/23 



Sea Trail Intercollegiate 4th/9 
Sea Trail Intercollegiate 4th/9 
Sea Trail Intercollegiate 4th/9 



Lady Pirate 
Intercollegaite 

Lady Pirate 
Intercollegaite 

Palmetto 
Intercollegiate 

Palmetto _ 
Intercollegi 



5th/ 1 5 



5th/ 1 5 



1 2th/ 1 8 



I 0th/ I 8 



156 SPORTS 




Team 

er 



Ashley Barbee 

Diana Davis 

Meghan Green 

Kelsey Johnson 

Lauren Lebak 

Virginia Mayer 

Tara McFadden 

Dani Mullin 

Shannon Prunty 

Lindsey Thomka 




it 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 




^ 





158 SPORTS 



;*.*-4 




^ Te a m 

Roster 



Jacqueline Alnes 

Rachel Banner 

Caitlin Beeler 

Katy Burns 

Dana Caltado 

Meaghan Collins 

Allyson Costa 

Urysla Cotton 

Veronica Day 

Morgan Denecke 

Emily Fournier 

Lauren Frederickson 

Alyssa Girvin 

Stephanie Giunta 



Lauren Hawkcsvvorth 

Cara Hughes 

Jordan Lee 

Andrea March 

Laura Martens 

Clara Martin 

Sarah McKenna 

Janelle McNeil 

Katelyn O'Dunne 

Christine Pacewicz 

Sullivan Parkes 

Melissa Provost 

Melanie Reyer 

Amanda Rice 



Justine Robertson 

Catherine Rossi 

Madison Russo 

Amy Salek 

Justine Schulerud 

Sarah Skogen 

Jennine Strange 

Emily Tryon 

Melissa Turowski 

Monique Vines 

Geena Vontress 

Courtney Weathers 

Brittany Wilkins 

Lauren Wilmer 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Junior Lauren Hawkesworth 
excels in the long jump and holds the school record in the 
triple jump with a distance of 37'6". Track and field members 
compete in a variety of events, including the long jump. 
Junior Lauren Fredrickson runs the 800-meter event at the 
UNC Classic. Head coach Mark Elliston and assistant coach 
Christina Engel offer support to the team members. Photo 
courtesy of Justine Schulerud and The Pendulum. 



^^^^^^^pp- \^ 


1 


1 


H^v^v 2 


b 


l1 


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BJuPl 


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9 



No. 19 Duke 



Lost, 0-7 



No. 60 East Tennessee State Lost, I -6 



William & Mary 



Lost, 1-6 



No. 52 UNC Wilmington 



Lost, 3-4 



North Florida 



Lost, 1-4 



No. 46 South Carolina 



Lost, 0-7 



No. 48 NC State 



Lost, 0-7 



No. 73 use Upstate 



Lost, 2-5 



Charlotte 



Won, 6- 1 



Georgia Southern 



Won, 5-2 



Samford 



Won, 5-1 



Chattanooga 



Won, 7-0 



Radford 



Lost, 1-6 



No. 60 College of Charleston Lost, 3-4 



The Citadel 



Lost, 3-4 



UNC Greensboro 



Davidson 



Won, 4-3 



Furman 



Wofford 



Won, 6- 1 



Appalachian State 



East Carolina 



Won, 5-2 



earn 

Roster 




Carlos Arboleda 

Thomas Darling 

Chase Helpingstine 

Clark Howell 

Philip Nemec 

Alberto Rojas 

Eric Turner 

Codv StaufFer-MacDowell 




^ 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Junior Alberto Rojas swings 
with all his might. Junior Philip Nemec quietly congratulates 
himself for scoring a point. Junior Chase Helpingstine runs to 
make a backhand swing. Helpingstine prepares to receive the 
ball while his partner Eric Turner goes for the serve. Photos 
courtesy of Heather Cassano and The Pendulum. 





4, ,«* 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



No. 39 Wake Forest 

North Carolina Central 

North Carolina A&T 

No. 55 Virginia Tech 

Radford 

Lees-McRae 

Winston-Salem State 

No. 1 1 North Carolina 

UNC Wilmington 

use Upstate 

Charlotte 

Chattanooga 

Presbyterian 

Western Carolina 

Appalachian State 

Georgia Southern 

College of Charleston 

Samford 

Davidson 

Furman 

Wofford 

UNC Greensboro 



Gardner- Webb 



Won, 6- 1 



^ Team 

Roster 




Briana Berne 

Laura Graybill 

Paige Kensrue 

Daleen Kloppers 

Jessica Margolis 

Anna Millian 

Lauren Sessoms 

Elisa Simonetti 

Hayley Wahl 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The team gathers for a cheer before 
playing their matches. Freshman Briana Berne backs up senior Laura 
Graybill as she dives towards a ball. Sophomore Daleen Kloppers 
prepares for the return as senior Anna Milian hits the ball. Senior 
Paige Kensrue uses her strength to hit a ball over the net. Photos 
courtesy of Heather Cassano and The Pendulum. 





'.fr. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



Towson 

Ohio 

North Carolina A&T 

High Point 

No. 6 Rice 

Texas A&M Corpus Christi 

Nebraska 

Buckneii 

Princeton 

Princeton 

Radford 

Old Dominion 

Furman 

Furman 

Furman 

UNC Wilmington 

The Citadel 

The Citadel Lost, 

The Citadel 

No. 5 Clemson 

No. 5 Clemson 

Davidson 

Davidson 

Davidson W( 

No. 23 East Carolina 

Wake Forest 

UNC Greensboro 

UNC Greensboro 

UNC Greensboro 

No. 20 North Carolina 

Georgia Southern 

Georgia Southern 

Georgia Southern 

Liberty 

Wake Forest 

Western Carolina 

Western Carolina 

Western Carolina 

High Point 

College of Charleston 

College of Charleston 

College of Charleston 

Liberty 

North Carolina State 

Wofford 

Wofford 



North Carolina 
UNC Wilmington 
Appalachian State 
Appalachian State 
Appalachian State 
East Carolina 
Samford 
Samford 
Samford 



Won, 8-2 

Won, 1 1 -4 

Won, 14-0 

Won, 8-3 

Lost, 7-2 

hristi Lost, 16-12 

Lost, 5-3 

Lost, 18-3 

Won, 10-2 

Won, 18-8 

Won, 7-6 

Won, 10-9 

Won, S-3 

Won, 9-6 

Lost, 5-4 

Lost, 14-1 

Lost, 9-4 

Lost, 20-15(10 inn.) 

Lost, I I -8 

Won, 15-10 

Won, 4-3 

Won, 8-3 

Won, 12-4 

Won, 42 (I I Inn.) 

Lost, 8-0 

Won, 17-12 

Won, 17-10 

Won, 12-1 

Won, 19-5 

a Won, 4-2 

Won, 10-3 

Lost, 5-4 

Lost, 4-0 

Won, 5-3 

Won, 9-8 

Won, 3-0 

Lost, 14-8 

Won, 12-10 

Lost, 6-4 

I Won, 14-3 

I Lost, 16-6 

I Lost, 6-4 

Won, 3-1 

Won, 13-9 

Won, 8-2 

Won, 14-4 

Lost, 12-10 

Lost, 17-7 

Won, 9-2 

Won, 5-4 

Won, 6- 1 

Won, 13-3 

Lost, 7-4 

Won, 6-4 

Lost, 1 1-10(10 Inn.) 

Won, 5- 1 




^. •T^ 






i^'^-^. 





Ro 


earn 
ster 


Niko Fraser 


Grant McCoury 


^9 ^^^ ■ 

Matt Kirchner 


Chris Brcsnahan 


Ryan Adams 


Ryan Ciunther 


Neal Pritchard 


Jared Kernodle 


Dylan Clark 


Seth Canipe 


J.D. Reichenback 


|im Stokes 


David Wood 


Ben Scott 


Bobby Kennedy 


Justin Hilt 


Kyle Webb 


Mitch Conner 


Mike MeliUo 


Anthony Hezar 


rliomas Girdwood 


Matt Hinson 


Daniel Britt 


Joe O'Hagan 


limmy Reyes 


Alex Swim 


Jordan Darnell 


Harry Austin 


Ken Ferrer 


Greg Amorosso 


Alex Maruri 


Brad MacHaffie 




Scott Riddle 


John Brebbia 





CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Senior J.D. Reichenbach 
pitches a ball straight to Elon's catcher, junior Neal Pritchard. 
Junior Ken Ferrer prepares to deliver a pitch. This player 
sprints to first base. Senior Justin Hilt slides into home plate. 
Photos courtesy of The Pendulum. 





WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



UNC Wilmington 


Won, 5-4 (10 inn.) 


Virginia 




Won, 10-8 


Rider 


Won, 


11-0(5 Inn.) 


Georgetown 




Won, 8-4 


Georgetown 




Won, 2- 1 


Rider 




Won, 5-1 


iUPUl 




Won, 7-6 


lUPUl 




Lost, 2-5 


IUPUl 


Won, 9-0 (5 Inn.) 


Middle Tennessee State 


Won, 6- 1 


Minnesota 




Lost, 4-9 


No. 4 Georgia 




Lost, 2-8 


Belmont 




Won, 14-6 


Eastern Kentucky 




Won, 7- 1 


Eastern Kentucky 




Lost, 3-2 


Western Carolina 


Won, 


13-1 (6 Inn.) 


Western Carolina 


Won, 


15-0(5 inn.) 


Western Carolina 


Won, 


18-2(5 inn.) 


No. 16 North Carolina 




Won, 1 -0 


Appalachian State 


Lost, 5-2 (8 Inn.) 


Appalachian State 




Won, 1-0 


Appalachian State 




Won, 3-2 


Coastal Carolina 




Won, 13-1 


Coastal Carolina 




Lost, 2-0 


College of Charleston 


Won, 8-0 (6 Inn.) 


College of Charleston 




Lost, 4- 1 


College of Charleston 




Won, 5-4 


North Carolina A&T 




Won, 6-3 


North Carolina A&T 




Won, 10-0 


UNC Greensboro 




Won, 2- 1 


UNC Greensboro 




Lost, 6-0 


UNC Greensboro 




Won, 6-1 


Longwood 




Lost, 9-0 


Longwood 


Lost, 4-0 (6 Inn.) 


Furman 




Lost, 4-0 


Furman 




Won, 3-2 


Furman 




Won, 1-0 


Campbell 


Won, 8-6 (9 Inn.) 


Campbell 




Won, 5-2 


Chattanooga 




Won, 3-2 


Chattanooga 




Won, 7-6 


Chattanooga 




Lost, 6-0 


Charlotte 




Won, 4-3 


Charlotte 




Lost, 4-2 


Samford 




Won, 5-3 


Samford 




Lost, 2- 1 


Samford 




Won, 8-4 


Georgia Southern 




Lost, 3-2 


Georgia Southern 




Lost, 14-9 


Georgia Southern 




Lost, 7-4 


East Carolina 




Lost, 1-0 


East Carolina 


Lost, 8-0 (6 Inn.) 


Winthrop 




Won, 6-3 


Winthrop 


Won, 8-6 (9 Inn.) 




SPORTS 



^m:* 



)><?%m 




Team 
Roster 



Carly MacDcuigall 


Lauren Tavlor 


Hannah Shelton 


Pam DelPizzo 


lackie Gonzalez 


Karl Pervell 


Erin O'Shea 


Camille Hill 


Caitlin McGowan 


Tomcka Watson 


Emerald Graham 


Danielle Lafferty 


Kaitlyn Piazzolla 


Morgan Wright 


Ashlee Crewe 


Ashley Myers 



CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The team. Junior Kaitlyn 
Piazzolla, junior Caitlin McGowan, sophomore Danielle 
Lafferty, junior Jackie Gonzalez and sophomore Erin O'Shea, 
congratulates each other on a good play. Junior Caitlin 
McGowan sprints towards first base. Sophomore Erin O'Shea 
throws a fast pitch. Sophomore Kaitlyn Piazzolla smashes a hit 
into the field. Photos courtesy of The Pendulum. 




WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 1 67 







t#^ ^-^p" 



'.4^ *«'-•>' 'ps ' 










.•'».^..«:^ 




a 




5-on-5 Basketball 
4-on-4 Flag Football 
Arena Football 
Cornhole 
Dodgeball 
Flag Football 
[ndoor Soccer 
'onster Golf Tournament ~ 

utdoor Basketball 

utdoor Soccer 
..acquetball Tournament 
Sand Volleyball 
Singles Tennis Tournament 
Softball 

Table Tennis Tournament 
Team Tennis 
Ultimate Frisbee 
Volleyball 

Wallyball Tournament 
Winter Term Bowling League 



s tr-^iSE-?^ 



t" 



j». 



l. 



sA 



Baseball 
Cycling 
Equestrian 
Field Hockey 
Golf 

Martial Arts 
Men's Basketball 
Men's Lacrosse 
Men's Rugby 

len's Soccer 

oiler Hockey 
Softball 
Swimming 
Tennis 
Triathalon 
Ultimate Frisbee 
Volleyball 
Water Ski 

Women's Basketball 
Women's Lacrosse 
Women's Rugby 
-Women's Soccer — 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 




Sophomore Erin O'Shea focuses intently on hitting the ball. It was 
this kind of focus that named Erin to the all-tournament team. 
Photo courtesy of The Pendulum. 



The second-seeded Elon Phoenix 
(38-19) tallied five runs in the top 
of the seventh inning to defeat 
No. 4 UNC Greensboro 6-3 and clinch its 
first-ever Southern Conference Softball 
Championship. The 38 wins by the 
Phoenix are the most in program history. 

With the victory, Elon earns the 
Southern Conference's automatic bid to 
the 2010 NCAA Softball Championship. 
The Elon team and friends will gather 
at The Fat Frogg in Elon on Sunday, 
May 16 to watch the NCAA Selection 
Show at 10 p.m. on ESPNU to learn 
its opponent in the NCAA Regional. 

For their efforts, Elon's Kaitlyn 
PiazzoUa, Tomeka Watson, Erin 
O'Shea and Ashlee Crewe were 
named to the all-tournament team. 

Tomeka led off the top of the seventh 
with a double to right center that was 
followed by an infield single off the bat 
of Jackie Gonzalez. A throwing error by 
the Spartans allowed Caitlin McGowan 
to reach base and Tomeka to score 
from second for the tying run. Emerald 
Graham picked up an RBI single up the 
middle, sending Emerald home and 
putting Elon ahead 3-2. After a UNCG 
(27-30) pitching change, Kaitlyn knocked 
the second pitch she saw out of the park, 
just inside the left field pole, for a three- 
run homer and put Elon on top 6-3. 

In the bottom of the seventh, the 
Spartans picked up a run on a one- 
out RBI single from Alex Emeterio. 
Elon pitcher Lauren Taylor got Eileen 
Horsmon to ground out before retiring 
Kaitlin Merkt to seal the 6-3 victory. 

Steady pitching from Erin and 
UNCG's Cory Mattson limited the 



offenses to just four base runners 
over the first two innings of play. 

The Phoenix used a pair of singles 
by Tomeka and Jackie to put runners 
at the corners with two outs in the top 
of the third inning. Caitlin drove in the 
first run of the game with a chopper 
through the left side that scored Watson 
from third and gave Elon a 1-0 lead. 

UNCG tied the game at one in 
the bottom of the fourth after Laura 
Olenderski drew a bases-loaded walk 
that sent Kaitlin across the plate. 
With one away and the bases loaded, 
Brittany Ausley grounded out to second, 
allowing Heather Robb to score and 
giving the Spartans a 2-1 edge. 

The Phoenix had chances in both 
the fifth and sixth innings, as it left two 
runners on in both innings. Tomeka 
and Jackie reached on a fielder's choice 
and a single in the fifth but were left 
stranded as the final two batters were 
retired. Elon had runners at the corners 
in the sixth, but Kaitlin grabbed a 
line drive at short to end the inning 
and any chance of a Phoenix run. 

Jackie posted three hits and a run 
for the Phoenix while Kaitlyn tallied 
two hits and three RBI. Watson also 
posted two hits while scoring twice. 

Lauren picked up the win to move 
to 17-7 on the season. She hurled 3.2 
innings in relief, giving up one run on 
two hits while fanning three batters. 
Erin tossed 3.1 innings to start the 
game. She gave up two runs on three 
hits and struck out five Spartan batters. 

JEN BLACKWELL / CONTRIBUTOR 



.^-.'^.•:^:^:^ -^ 



Congratulations Elon Phoenix 

Women's Softball 2009-2010 




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^KiffisiSKa«HiTmm-a»^*« amtn McGowan and Camlll 

DelPizzo, Carly Macdougall and Jackie Gonzalez. Photo courtesy of Kristin Simonetti. 



Elon Softball claims first-ever SoCon Championship! They 
will face No. 6 Georgia at NCAA Regional on May 21, 2010. 



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WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 1 7 1 




I 72 WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



Career To The 



A Little Hard Work 
\lever Hurt Anyone! 




t I ihere is no such thing as an "average 
I workload" at Elon University. Maybe 

^ you spent the majority of your time 
studying biology and other academic subjects, 
or perhaps you decided to become a regular 
at West End. You may have been engulfed in 
a sea of extracurricular activities or worked a 
job on the side to pull in some extra dough. 
Whatever you did while you were here, it will 
undoubtedly be remembered as a time that you 
will not forget in the near future. 

As you consider what this whole college 
experience was all about (and as you 
underclassmen ponder the remainder of your 
college career), the adage "a little hard work 
never hurt anyone" may come to mind. It is 
possible to balance many of the aspects of 
college life, but this equilibrium is a feat within 
itself. Freshman year, we are educated (from a 
theoretical perspective, in my opinion) on the 
importance of aspects of life in order to become 
a "healthy" and balanced person. But when do 
you find time to sleep? 

Elon is exactly what you make of it. For 
many, it is an institution of learning. Many find 
it as a time to truly connect with professors, 
those who have mastered their craft and have 
progressed into a career path devoted to your 
success and their own continued learning. Four 
years is up for approximately one-fourth of our 
student body, and whether or not you worked 
as hard as you could/should/ would have, make 
the most of what is to come. Peace out. 

JOSH WHANGER / SENIORS SECTION EDITOR 



r 





22, 20fO 



V 





After attending a complimentary breakfast around 
Fonville Fountain, graduating students assembled 
in Jordan Gym to prepare for the commencement 
exercises. Much deliberation was given to the weather, as 
the forecast predicted a rainy morning. Students were asked 
to pick up two rain tickets prior to the commencement 
exercises. Fortunately, the weather held out long enough 
for students to walk under the Oaks, shake hands with 
President Leo Lambert and receive their college diplomas. 

Prior to the commencement exercises. Jay Reno, senior 
class president, present President Lambert with a check for 
$16,062.05. Jay said that 200 seniors made contributions 
to their class gift of a sustainability research grant. 

Laith Al-Majali, an Elon alum from 2005, delivered the 
commencement address. Laith, a native of Jordan, came 
to Elon in 2001 as the university's first King Hussein of 
Jordan Scholar. He established himself as a campus leader, 
providing a unifying voice during campus gatherings in the 
days following the 9/11 terrorist attacks. After his graduation, 
Laith began his career as a filmmaker. His film, "Captain 
Abu Raed, " was the first feature film to emerge from Jordan 
in 50 years and won the World Cinema Audience Award 
at the prestigious Sundance Film Festival in 2008, when 
he also was named Elon's Young Alumnus of the Year. 

Just as Laith approached the podium, a freight train 
loudly passed through Elon. As he waited for the train to 
pass, Laith took photos of the graduates. President Lambert 
and Kelli Palmer, the president of the alumni association. 

Laith spoke to students about the importance 



of rising to the challenges presented to them. 

"I spent countless nights thinking of what I 
wanted to say to fill the next ten minutes," he said. 
"It was good practice for self-reflection." 

Ultimately, iTunes came to the rescue. Laith chose 
to name his commencement address "Raise It Up" 
after one of the songs in his selection. Laith joked that 
not many commencement titles come from hip hop 
records, yet he was able to use the phrase to reflect 
on his experiences during and since Elon, in order 
to provide motivation for this year's graduates. 

"We need to raise it up," Laith said. "Passion and hard 
work go hand in hand and are the key to success. Be original 
and don't be afraid to take big challenges. You have all 
the tools and skillsets to stand out as global leaders." 

Following the commencement exercises, graduates, 
families and guests attended various receptions around 
campus, hosted by Elon's academic departments. 
Graduates were able to pick up their long-awaited 
oak saplings and alumni association information 
packets at the Koury Athletic Concourse. 

Before packing up their belongings and embarking 
on their journeys, graduates said their final goodbyes to 
faculty and peers. Many graduates delighted in taking 
photos across campus with their loved ones. It is their 
way of remembering the special times at Elon and taking 
these precious moments with them into their future. 

LESLEY COWIE / EDITOR IN CHIEF 



« 





ABOVE, LEFT: Libby Russell excitedly spots her family in the audience. 

ABOVE, RIGHT: After walking across the stage, Catherine Melendez proudly displays her diploma in the air. 
RIGHT: As the Elon freight train passed through, speaker Laith al-Majali joyously took a photo of his crowd. 
Photos by Kim Walker. 



SENIORS 



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Following exams, senior students enjoyed 
almost a full week of relaxation. They had the 
luxury of attending various events leading 
up to Commencement 2010, including the senior 
picnic, evening gala, baccalaureate and more. 

Both the senior picnic and evening gala took place 
on Wednesday, May 19. Students attended these events 
free with a ticket from Johnston Hall and could bring a 
guest for $10. Despite the rainy weather in the beginning 
of the week, the senior picnic was held outside on the 
Moseley Center Green from noon-2 p.m. Students enjoyed 
food and fellowship with peers, faculty and staff. 

From 9 p.m. to midnight, the Moseley Center staff closed 
down the building entirely for the seniors attending the 
evening gala. Jay Reno, senior class president, distributed 
the information regarding the gala, saying that nearly one- 
third of graduating seniors attended the event in 2009. It 
was his goal to see half the senior class at the gala this year. 
Having their tickets and driver's licences, seniors came 
"dressed to impress" at the gala to dance with their friends 
and enjoy free hor d'oeuvres. After a stressful semester, 
seniors relished the opportunity to relax and have fun. 

One of the final academic celebrations before commencement 
came during the receptions for graduates and their families 



hosted by faculty in Elon's schools. Each school - College of 
Arts and Sciences, Martha and Spencer Love School of Business, 
School of Communications and School of Education - hosted 
a reception on Friday, May 21 for its graduating seniors. This 
gave students an opportunity to express their gratitude to their 
professors and introduce their mentors to their families. 

The Rev. Sam Wells, dean of Duke University Chapel, 
delivered the 2010 Baccalaureate sermon also on May 21, 
in the Koury Athletic Center. His sermon offered best 
wishes to the graduating seniors. Senior Ashley Culicchia 
graced the audience with her soprano singing voice, and 
Jonathan Mahlandt discussed the lasting nature of the 
relationships he has made at Elon in his remarks. 

Following Baccalaureate, graduating seniors had the 
opportunity to attend the Celebration of Leaders of the Twenty- 
First Century in the McCrary Theatre. The event served as 
additional motivation for seniors entering the workforce. 

By the end of the week, graduating seniors were ready 
for their commencement. They had spent quality time 
vrith their peers and mentors and were excited to put the 
motivation and wisdom they acquired in their last four years 
to the test. This was the moment students had awaited. 

LESLEY COWIE / EDITOR IN CHIEF 



•'»-.i.«:'<i:^'n^^ 





CLOCKWISE FROM 
TOP LEFT: Students 
entered in the dance- 
off at the evening gala 
compete to be the best 
dancer. Graduates pose 
behind an ice sculpture 
commemorating the 
year of their college 
graduation. Catherine 
Siegel, Michelle Murphy, 
Mariah Koster and 
Jennifer Kennedy pose 
under a balloon archway 
at the senior picnic. 
Alex Coffman hesitantly 
joins the picnic, carrying 
a fun graduation cap 
decorated with her name 
and graduating year. 
Photos courtesy of Kim 
Walker, The Pendulum 
and Corey Groom. 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 1 77 








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SENIORS 



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Bv the Numbers 



18 



Number of graduates with Bachelor 
of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts and 
Bachelor of Science degrees 



Total number of students graduating 
Summa Cum Laude 



145 



Total number of students graduating 
Magna Cum Laude 



m 



Total number of students graduating 
Cum Laude 




CLOCKWISE FROM TOP 
LEFT: Emmy Kean listens 
to the Rev. Phil Smith and 
awaits her chance to walk 
across stage. Jerome Lewis 
is all smiles after receiving 
his diploma. Some seniors 
decorated their caps 
so their families could 
instantly find them among 
the crowd. Michael Sherry 
excitedly displays the inner 
contents of his diploma, 
which includes a photo of 
Alamance Building. Photos 
by Kim Walker. 









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// 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 1 79 




to the 




207d 




Taylor Abbott Olivia Ackerman Carly Altizer Chelsea Anderson James Anderson Brett Arnold 1^ 




Kathleen Austin Karlee Averett Patrick Bachmann Mason Barker Ashley Bamas Vincent Barrett Annie Bartels I \ 




Kellie Barth Lauren Beckham Christopher Beeson Allee Bennett Bradford Bennett Ashley Bodine Lisa Bodine | f. 




Amanda Bonine Shannon Boone 



SENIORS 



^V.«^v ^■* ■•''-. •^. • .-^ 



Senior Spotlight: 




Laura Brainer 



I. aura Brainer makes traveling the world seem like a casual 
occurrence. During her stay at Hlon, she has met the suave 
gentlemen of' Italy, the nomads of Australia and the high- 
profile fashion designers of London, just to name a few. 

Stemming from her work with the non-profit 
organization Back2Back ministries, as an educator in 
Monterrey, Mexico, Laura most recently traveled to India to 
teach science to middle-school-age children. Needless to say, 
she has already been making excellent use of her strategic 
communications major. 



JOSHUA WHANGER/ 
SENIORS SECTION EDITOR 




\,. \.indra Brewer 



Ellis Bridecrs 



>akira Bristol Alison Brooks .^mancla Brown Cxntra Brown 




karen Brown 



James Brvant 



Martin Burke Jennifer Burns Brittany Byrd Denise Canavaggro Christina Carter 




Casey Casline Hunter Cavell Paul Chabai Sarah Chaffee LuisChaparro Rachel Cien Jonathan Citty 




I 



Kelly Clark Susan Cogswell .^dam Conslantine Urysla Cotton Kara Cowdrick Lesley Cowie 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



Graduating seniors line up at 

the senior picnic to fill their 

plates. Students chose between 

pork barbeque and grilled 

chicken. They enjoyed having the 

opportunity to relax and mingle 

with peers and faculty. Photo 

courtesy of The Pendulum. 




BSB 




Megan Cunningham Elizabeth Czerwinski Mary Danahy Jordan Daniel Devin Darretl Clarence Davis Kelsey Davis I ^ 




TifTany Davis Victoria Davis Katherine Day Heather Dedrick Alexander Delong Evan Dempster Lorelle Dennis I C 




Lindsay Depow Claire Derreberry Andie Diemer Stefan Dimuzio Mykel Dodson Elise Donoho EUzabeth Donovan I Rd 




Andrea Dorrow Rebecca Dotson Timothy Douglas Ross Draper Alan Duvall Brandon Echter 



1 



ENIORS 



-.^.%.«:'^ 



Senior Spotlight: 




Terrell Hudsins 



Not many students go to college to set records, 
but that is exactly what happened during 
Terrell Hudgins' four years at Elon. 

Otien referred to as T-mobile by teammates, Terrell 
has boosted the Elon football program through his 
excellent pass catching and controlled quickness. 

Signed as an undrafted free agent in late April, 
Terrell will be playing for the Dallas Cowboys with 
the support of Elon fans all over because of the 
lasting impression that he has made here. 



JOSHUA WHANGER / 
SENIORS SECTION EDITOR 




lliam Elliot Trace\ Evans Lindsa> E\ersole Catherine Falkenbur\' Craig Filazzola Rachaei Fine Katrina Folsom 




I ^r^:.;;-.c lox 



KeN'in Fox Chelsea Frame Nicole Frank 



Laura Funk 



Emilv Gaul 



Frances Gee 



Nicholas Gentile l^anne Gerelus Daniel Gibtions Erica Gierlach Kelsey Gilman Renee Gilmer Cynthia Goodson 




James Gorsuch Scotl Grable Amanda Green Sarah Greenbaum Conner Grcga Hunter Gros 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 






During the senior picnic, 

students were able to take 

photos and mal<e memories 

underneath the celebratory 

2010 balloon arch. The same 

arch adorned the Moseley 

Center in the evening, for the 

senior gala. Many students 

seized the opportunity to take 

a photo with someone special 

underneath the artch. Photo 

courtesy of The Pendfulum. 




Randall Gyllenhaal Sandra Haime Steven Haines Mary Hansen Erin Harbaugh Jillian Harmon Sara Harrel 




David Harrison Roberta Hawthorne Amelia Helms Brandon Helton James Hennon Alexandra Hensley Melanie Herrmann 




Stephanie Hicks Kristin Hilgartner Catherine Hill Sarah Hindle David Hitch Christine Howell Michael Hoyt 




Benjamm Huggnis Alison Hydrick Grace lorio 



Carmen Isaac 



Julia Jacobs George Jenkins 



ENIORS 



Senior Spotlight: 




Kristen Klu' 



It's dirticull lo imagine a perfect path into ambassadorship, 
but Kristen Klug is already trail-blazing her way toward 
this intense career path. She presides over weekly Model 
UN sessions as the Chair ot the Counsel and proudly 
sports her title of \'ice President as the group travels 
to competitions in Georgetown and Princeton. 

Double majoring in international studies and 
history, combined with her Gerinan minor, makes for 
a hectic schedule, but Kristen has managed to keep 
the delicate balance of work and fun while at Elon. 

JOSHUA WHANGER / 
SENIORS SECTION EDITOR 



B 

Cam Jessup 

B 




D 

Eden Johnson 

Q 




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B 

Curtis Johnston 

Q 




Kaya Jones 

B 




B 

Nathaniel Jones 

B 


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Kvle Johnson 

II 




Melanie Johnson 



'. a Jorgensen- 
Graham 



Da\!dKa> Jcnniler Kenned> -Amanda Kennison Caroline KJing Knslen Klug JacUn Koehn 



^)uelyn LaRussa Knsten LeBeau Brittan\ Lee Samantha Leonard John Lesko Jerome Lewis Morgan Little 




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c\ Lleuellvn Marcus Lockamv Natalie Loihc 



Kevin Lo\ell Ene Lud\Mg Melanie Lutz 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



This student searches the 

decorated graduation hats 

for her own. These caps 

were displayed at the senior 

picnic and given to graduating 

seniors as a souvenir of this 

special time at Elon. Photo 

courtesy of The Pendulum. 




1 




John Lynn Conley Lyons Manuel Maccou Tara MacDaniels Christine Maiha Kevin Manship Erick Marin 





Ameha Martin Lindsay Martin Courtney Mas Nicholas Massa Melissa Mastropolo Jill Maxham Kathryn Mazzarip 



Mica McCullough Kristen McDonald Kelsey McEvoy Cameron McGlenn Kristi McGrath Makaila McKinlej] 



186 SENIORS 



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Senior Spotlight: 




Travis Butler 



I 



Senior digital art major I'ravis Butler describes 
his artistic vision in one word - "experimental." 

His work with animal bones, found objects, 
lelt masks and mythical creatures gives the sense 
ol a constructed reality never betore explored. 

A mixed-media artist, Travis sketches, paints 
and works with fiber and digital programs. 
'Ilirough fiber art, fiber installation and digital 
imagery, Travis said he ultimately hopes to 
achieve a detached reality in his installation. 

Travis said he does not expect or want everyone 
to walk away from his work with the same 
understanding. Rather, he said he hopes they will 
experience the installation at different levels but 
ultimately grasp the larger themes of different levels 
of framing, searching and constructed space. 



MY NGUYEN / CONTRIBUTOR 




ZIBSQ 



.\shley Meares Sara Midgeit Jessica Milam Alexandra Milan Tristan Milder Dan Miller 




Samantha Miller Patrick Minnock Paul Mirek 



Chelsea Moir Jose Molina Katherinc Molzon Morgan Morris 




Alexis Moss Michelle Murph\ Laura Norwind Chinwe Nwoko Elizabeth O'Connor Alexandra O'Neal 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 1 87 



I 



- 7^:4 



! 



These seniors celebrate a 

fun evening at the senior 

gala, complete with 

glow sticks and balloons. 

Photo by Corey Groom. 





Craig Orsi Matthew Osbome Jennifer Oseroff Kelly Ostazeski Wilson Owens Sara Pasquinelli Kathryn Peraza 




Rachel Perlman Keith Perri Keadrick Peters Christina Peterson Kenan Petrash Philip Pons Mariana Poole 





Elizabeth PortnofT Darius Prevost Megan Prilutski Ashley Pullan Joe Purgason II Susan Ramer 



(88 SENIORS 



Senior Spotlight: 




Chris Staskel 



when most Elon students think ot a lumen 
Scholar, they probably think of students 
researching vaccination programs in Africa 
or learning about medical practices in remote 
parts of Asia. Ihis isn't always the case. 

Senior Lumen Scholar and Honors Fellow 
Chris Staskel turned his experience as a musical 
theater major into a research project titled "Finding 
id; Developing an Original Musical within the 
Workshop Process. " In collaboration with 2009 Elon 
alumnus Dan Gibson, Chris created an original 
musical. Dan was responsible for composing, 
while Chris acted as lyricist and book writer. 

After graduation, Chris plans to enroll in a 
two-year theater-writing intensive program at New 
York University, while living as a working actor. 



RACHEL SOUTHMAYD / CONTRIBUTOR 




Nichole Rawlings Kc\ in Rea\cs 



Douglas Reeder ."Abigail Remein Jay Reno 



Eric Reuscliiing .Alisha Richardson 



Julia Roberts Elizabeth Robertson Mar\ Robinson Danielle Rounds Gina Rum 





WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



These graduating seniors take 

a moment to pose togther at 

the senoir picnic. The events 

leading to commencement 

will be remembered by many 

for years to come. Photo 

courtesy of The Pendulum. 





Laura Smith Sunny Smith Ehzabeth Somerville Erin Southard Brandy Sparks Emily Speer 




Ryan Sweeney Katie Tabor 



Joshua Tate Jenna Temple Carlyn Templeton Alexa Terry HoUis Theard 



I 



SENIORS 



Senior Spotlight: 




Kevin Swett 



Kevin Swett has steadily been working his way into 
corporate America. Accepted into Elon as a Business Fellow, 
Kevin began taking business classes from the get-go, as he 
worked toward his finance and entreprencurship majors. 

Traveling to Poland in the winter of his 
freshman year was just the first of his experiential 
learning; Kevin also traveled to Grenoble, 1-rance 
for a semester to progress in his French minor 
and to Chile in the winter of his senior year. 

While he was in the States, Kevin interned at New York 
Mortgage Company, Hewlett Packard and IP Morgan. 
These experiences have all prepared Kevin for his exciting 
starting position as a Prime Services Analyst for JP Morgan. 



JOSHUA WHANGER/ 
SENIORS SECTION EDITOR 




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Catherine Thicrcr ■\ndrc\\ Thompson 



.IcITrc) Thurm Grace* Tnlhng Core\ Trout 



fileni xanRodcn 




Walker White 



Christine Wieand 



Jerried Williams 



Kristin Williams 



Miriam Williamson 



Lvllian Wimberlv 



Lauren Wisniewski 




Sarah Woody 



Jacqueline Wright 



Courtney Wynn 



Bennett ^'aneev 



Kirslen Garwood 



Elise Yaussy 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



Nichole Marie Rawlings 






It's so hard to believe four years ago we moved you 
into 3-VA! You have done during college what you 
have done your whole life-made us so proud to be 
your parents! We are so excited for the next chapter in 
your life. Know that whatever you do, we will always 
love and support you and continue to be so proud of 
the woman you have become. 
Love, 

Mom and Dad 



Honors Fellow Lumen Scholar President's List Phi Kappa Phi 




Phi Eta Sigma 



Iris vi. 



ersnissav 






We Qr^ %o proud of you and all that you have accomplished. 

Congratulations! 

Love, 
Mom, Dad and Ian 



192 SENIORS 



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Matthew P. Husack 



1 





Matthew, 

Four years went by so fast! We hope you cherish all the friends and memories you made at Elon. 
May the experiences and knowledge you acquired bring you success, but above all, may you find 
happiness in everything you do. We are very proud of you. Congratulations! 



Much Love, 

Dad, Mom, Daniel and Michael 



Devin Crane 

Shine as a light unto the world! 




Congratulations! 

We are proud of what you have 

accomplished. 

Love, 
Mom, Dad and Kim 




ersioji 



"Teaching is the tiigiiest form of understanding." 
-Aristotle 

Congratulations on an outstanding college 

career at Elon, Debbie... 

you will make a great teacher! 

Love, Mom and Dad 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 1 9: 



Hunter Gros 




194 SENIORS 



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We are all so proud of you! You have accomplished so much in your 
four years at Elon. You will have a bright future and will be an awesome 

teacher! 

Love, 
Mom, Feliz, Jenny, Robert and Michael 





C^ttsa/ Cydsiin^y 



Our lovely Casey A 

What an amazing four years you have had at Elon! 

From class rooms to dorm rooms 

Sorority life to dance life 
Traveling to Italy, and so much more 

Casey, you have such a bright spirit and a kind soul 
and we love that you lead with your heart. 

Take these words with you onto the next part of 
your journey and always remember.. 

"Donee /s iht hidden language of the soul" 

-Martha Graham 

We are so proud of what you have accomplished 
and the woman you have become... 

Congratulations!!! 

Love Mom, Dad & Britney 




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WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 1 95 



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Kevin Reaves 

"\is Xim^% likes these you learn to live again ... 
It's times like these you give and ^ive again ... 
It's times like these you learn to love again ... 
It's times like these, time and time again." 
- Foo Fighters 

Remember our nights of watching SNL?! Jim Carrey 
playing guitar on his leg?! GOOD TIMES! What a blessinj 
to have you for my son! Your huge smile and infectious 
laugh always melts my heart. I wish for you a life full 
of adventure, great joy, and the satisfaction that comes 
from persuing your passions. Always remember how 
much you are loved. I am SO very proud of you! 
Love, Mom 




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We are so proud of you! 

Congratulations 

Love, 

Dad, Mom and Nick 




SENIORS 



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Carl D.James 




May the 
adventure of life 
always till you 
with wonder 
and joy! 



Congratulations, 
Carl! 

Love, Mom 



J/^Vi// l^utrcck J^i/nn /// 




Congratulations John! 

We are all so proud of you. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad and Patrick 



\ 



Matthew Whaley 



Patrick Halloway 




Jne chapter closes and another opens; you have a 
Imarvelous future within your grasp. Reach high and 
remember those who love you will always be there! 
We are so proud of you, Matt! Congratulations. 
- Love, Mom, Dad & Seth 





Congratulations Patrick! 

We are so proud of all you have accomplished. 

Kappa Alpha, IFC, Community Service, Elon Academy, 

Scandinavia, Football, History and Economics! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Ryan & Sam 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 197 



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Congratulations Laura! 

You are moving from the Minni Apple to the Big Apple. 

We are so proud of you! 

Love, Mom, Dad, Dan, and Andrew 




8 SENIORS 



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We like our fun and we never fight 

You can't dance and stay uptight 

It's a supernatural delight 

Everybody was dancing in the moordight 

Congratulations! 

We are so proud of the friends you have 

made and your future together! 

Love, Sue and Dave 





WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



! 





DAVID KAY 

Whether at Elon or Down Under' your past four 

years have been filled with wonder. We are so 

proud of the young man that you have become... 

Congrats on your graduation our favorite brother 

and son! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad & Sally 






EliseYaussy 




We are so proud of you and the person you have 

become. 

Congratulations! 

Love, Mom and Samantha 





SENIORS 




Paul S. Mirek 



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Congratulations! We re very proud ot you! 

Love, 
Mom, Dad & Tim 




WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



iHE PENDULUM 

Elon University's Student Newspaper 






Graduation may have 
arrived, but you can still 
stay connected to Elon 
by getting The Pendulum 
delivered each week. 



Also, visit our Web site for 
the latest news at Elon: 
v^rww. elon. edu/pendulum 

Call The Pendulum office 
at 336-278-7247 or stop by 
our office on Williamson 
Avenue to subscribe! 



1 Year Subscription - $40.00 

2 Year Subscription - $70.00 

Send check or money order to: 

The Pendulum 
Campus Box 7012 
Elon, NC 27244 

Please Include: Name, address and phone number 



202 SENIORS 




tlisiillKliitjiK 



Class of 20 10 
i Psi Cli! 



id to be a part Oj 
^ere at Elon, nov 



lirailSimil 



informed. Take Elon with you. 



The Pendulum 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 203 



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Play by Play 



> n Elon's campus, it is easy to stay 

I educated and up to date about the news, 

with access to free newspapers and a 

variety of other media resources. As a result, Elon 
students are informed and knowledgeable about 
current events. 

As future change-makers, Elon students are 
compassionate and looking for ways to help 
out in every way they can. Tragic events in the 
news have inspired students to go out into the 
community and make a difference. 

Although a single news story cannot 
characterize a year, this year has seen some 
monumental changes. Ranging from a 
variety of celebrity deaths, such as pop icon 
Michael Jackson, and natural disasters, such as 
earthquakes, we have had a very eventful year. 
Elon students will look back on their college 
years and remember not only what happened on 
campus but the news stories that defined these 
years as well. 

ALLISON ZMOZYNSKI / NEWS SECTION EDITOR 



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propelled him to 
superstar status. 
Produced by Quincy 
Jones, it sold more than 
7 million copies. Photo 
by Beth A. Keiser (AP). 



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Michael Jackson 

August 29, 1958 -June 25, 2009 



Lifeline 






WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



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Michael lackson s death, along with the 
death ot several other intluential figures 
this year, has caused shock to the nation. 
On June 25, 2009, Jackson was reported dead 
following a 911 call from his Los Angeles residence. 
.•\fter a great deal of controversy, Jackson's death was 
eventually reported as "acute propofol intoxication." 

Jackson's death triggered a wealth of reactions. 
The media responded with constant coverage and 
updates about his sudden death. Social inedia 
outlets, such as Facebook and Twitter, buzzed 
with emotions. Jackson's memorial service drew in 
millions of viewers. Shortly after his death, "This 
Is It," a documentary film featuring Jackson's final 
performances, became available to the public. 
Jackson is known as the "King of Pop" and 
was an intluential businessman, philanthropist, 
choreographer and dancer in conjunction with 
being a globally recognized singer-songwriter. 

ALLISON ZMOZYNSKI / NEWS SECTION EDITOR 



11 




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ABOVE: Devastated fans visit Michael Jackson's star 
on Hollywood Boulevard. Photo by Nick Ut (AP). 
LEFT, TOP: Eric Muggins, of Bakerfield, Calif., 
holds a Michael Jackson poster at the Staples 
Center in Los Angeles on July 6, 2009, where the 
memorial service for pop star Michael Jackson 
was held. Photo by Rick Bowmer (AP). 
LEFT, BOTTOM: Following Michael Jackson's 
death, fans all over the world mourned. 
Photo by Christine Olssen (AP). 






WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 207 



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HlNl, commonly referred to as swine flu, has become a major global crisis since its identification in April 
2009. Originally observed as an epidemic in Mexico, the disease quickly spread globally, causing both 
the World Health Organization and the Center for Disease Control to classify the disease as a pandemic 
virus. While swine flu shares similar symptoms with the regular flu experienced every year, the new strain of 
influenza entered the global environment without developed immunizations. The severity of the swine pandemic 
had led to increased efforts across the world to contain the spread of the virus. 

To prepare the campus for the coming fall, Elon coordinated with both the Center for Disease Control and 
the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services to receive updates about the virus. As part of 
Elon's desire to contain the spread of swine flu across campus, various Purell instant hand sanitizers were installed 
throughout campus. 

The University took aggressive initiatives to ensure that the campus was prepared to handle the crisis. Students 
were advised to report any flu-like symptoms to the health center for proper assessment of the flu. Multiple 
cases of swine flu were reported throughout fall semester, and many students took the opportunity to receive 
vaccinations from October 12-14, 2009. Students with swine flu were instructed to stay in their rooms or, if 
applicable, remain at home until they recovered. 

The handling of the outbreak of swine flu was effectively handled by Elon's administration, affording students 
information and substantive means of ensuring a healthier environment across campus. 

PETER BOCK / NEWS SECTION EDITOR 



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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: 
In order to stay healthy, students 
must utilize a variety of healthcare 
items. One safety measure would 
be to get a flu shot. Other students 
simply chose to use hand sanitizer. 
Nursing student Kelli Emery, left, 
gets a nasal H I N I vaccine from Sara 
Wall, an infection control nurse, 
at Alamance Regional Hospital's 
Octoberfest. Octoberfest provides 
medical services, such as vaccinations, 
to hospital staff members. Senior 
Kenan Petrash walks into the 
Elon Health Center. Photos by 
Lindsay Fendt and Brian Allenby. 



I 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



Year 



of 

the 




Port-au-Prince, Haiti: 
A Helping Hand 





FROM TOP: Three young orphans gather beside 

senior John McGreevey before departing to meet 

their new parents in the United States. Doctors 

amputate an infected leg on the Icitchen table of 

the Matthew 25 Missionary House as John organizes 

medical supplies in the foreground. Photos courtesy 

of John McGreevy. 



hileans were shaken awake in their beds after a colossal 
magnitude 8.8 earthquake struck off the coast of Chile in 
'late February, killing at least 147 people. 

The quake struck at 3:34 a.m. (1:34 a.m. EST), approximately 
60 miles off the country's coast. Most of the serious damage and 
injuries occurred in Concepcion, Chiles second largest city, but 
damage can be seen throughout the country, including in Santiago, 
Chile's capital. 

"I had been in bed for about 5 minutes when everything started 
shaking," said Renee Zale, an Elon University junior spending the 
semester in Santiago. Renee, a Massachusetts native, had never 
experienced an earthquake before. 

"On the East Coast they don't really stress earthquake 
preparedness so it took me a second to realize what was going on, 
then one of my host sisters yelled my name and we all went and 
stood in a doorframe downstairs," she said. 

Renee's host family's home sustained no damages, but their 
neighborhood, like many in Santiago, had to wait to regain 
power. While Santiago suffered minimal amounts of structural 
damage, the power outages have severely restricted travel and 
communication within the city. Many traffic lights are not 
functioning, making it dangerous to drive. Although Santiago 
was spared the brunt of the quake, there were still cases of severe 
damages throughout the city. 

Rafael Rocco and Patricia Montecina were jolted out of bed, not 
only by the immense shaking from the earthquake but also from 
the sound of the collapse of their apartment complex's two-story 
parking garage. Tlie garage, located in Las Condes, a suburban 
neighborhood within the city, contained approximately 56 cars at 
the time of its collapse. All were completely destroyed. 

"The shaking from this earthquake was like nothing I have 
ever experienced," Rafael said. "Tliere have been earthquakes 
here before, but nothing like this during this time period. These 
buildings have survived many earthquakes, but this one was just 
too much." 

The center of Santiago, home to many historical buildings, was 
the most damaged by the quake. Older government buildings and 
churches sufl'ered serious structural damage, and one of the oldest 
churches in Santiago lost its bell tower. 

Despite these examples, due to the frequency of smaller 
earthquakes in Chile, all new buildings are subject to strict 

height and safety restrictions, meaning most people suffered 

little propert)' damage, unlike Concepcion where virtually every 
building in the city was somehow hurt. 

Angelica Zelaya, a retired secretary living in Las Condes, 
explained diat for many, the power outages were both the most 
terrifying and the most dangerous aspect of the quake. "I was very 
scared and was trying to get to a safe place," Angelica said. 

"But \vhat made the situation so much worse was the lack of 
light. No one could see anything, no one could get outside, no 
one could leave where they \\'ere." Like man)' other Santiguinos, 
Angelica's apartment regained power within several hoiu'S. 

"We have water here, and food and electricity," she said. "We are 
so fortunate here in Santiago, we can only hope and pray for those 
in other parts of the country." 

LINDSAY FENDT / CONTRIBUTOR 



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passes 

Unriversal 
Health Care 

hroughout the past year, members of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
have been working extremely hard on a health insurance reform that improves 
- the availability and quality of healthcare to Americans. The reform will cost $940 
>^...un over 10 years and will expand coverage to 32 million Americans who are uninsured 
Ihe new healthcare bill plans to provide the largest middle class tax cut for healthcare in 
history Under the plan, 95 percent of Americans should have insurance. The heathcare 
reform should also help to stabilize the federal budget and economy 



„.. ...„.v... ^., ^„.u, . .cMucm wuaina signeo tne nealth care reform into law, something 
that numerous presidents before him had been working on. The reform has ignited quite a 
debate among U.S. residents about whether or not the reform will be beneficial to citizens 
and if it is reasonable. 



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ALLISON ZMOZYNSKI / 
NEWS SECTION EDITOR 



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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: President 
Obama signs the health care bills. President 
Obama campaigns for healthcare reform 
at a "town hall" meeting in Portsmouth, 
N.H. A supporter of universal health care 
holds a sign at a rally. Henry Nicholas, 
president of National Union of Hospital 
And Health Care Employees, left, talks with 
Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Barack 
Obama D-lll., prior to Obama addressing 
a meeting of the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO 
convention in Philadelphia, Wednesday, 
April 2, 2008. Speaker Nancy Pelosi of 
California walks to the floor as the House 
prepares to vote on health care reform in 
the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on 
Sunday. Photos by J. Scott Applewhite, Jim 
Cole, Neil Parekh and Alex Brandon (AP). 



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The 2010 Census has sparked interest not only on college campuses, but ail 
over the country. The U.S. Census is required by the Constitution to count 
every resident in the United States every 10 years. The data collected from 
the census helps in multiple ways, such as deciding how many seats each state has 
in the U.S. House of Representatives and helping the government to decide which 
communities they can give over $400 billion in federal funding to help finance 
hospitals, job training centers, schools, public works projects and emergency services. 

The 2010 Census Road Tour event stopped at Elon this February as part of an 
outreach to college students. The road tour bus parked in Moseley Center and gave 
students the chance to learn more about the census with hands-on kiosks and exhibits. 
Students also had an opportunity to speak with representatives from the census 
to learn more how about it works. The road tour was an effort to make the census 
more personal and help college communities and the rest of the nation understand 
the importance of filling out the 10-question survey that was sent out in March. 

ALLISON ZMOZYNSKI / 
NEWS SECTION EDITOR 



Local Participation 

Alamance County, NC 
II 76 percent (20 10) 

National Rate 

II 72 percent (2010) 






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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: 
President Obama completes 
his 2010 Census form. A 
volunteer from the U.S. Census 
Road Tour waits for students 
to approach his table. More 
than 100 visitors met with 
representatives to learn how 
census date is collected and 
how that information may be 
useful in their future careers. 
These Elon students pose a 
photo in front of the tour 
bus. Citizens complete their 
census forms in an online 
format. This student learns 
about the data collection 
process from the census team 
member. Photos by Margeaux 
Corby and Pete Souza. 



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1 or your enjoyment, Phi Psi Cli has \ 

' included a new index section in which 
, students, faculty and staff may browse 
and find the pages where they are featured. 

The staff has spent many hours naming 
the students in photos, stories and captions 
in order to make viewing this book an easy 
and rewarding experience. We apologize for 
any circumstances in which identification 
was inaccurate or not possible. 

We recognize that students will use their 
yearbooks to reflect on their time at Elon. This 
may be as soon as they receive the book, or 
it could be many years down the road. This 
yearbook intends to record, highlight and 
commemorate the wonderful memories you 
have created during the 2009-2010 school year. 

We also recognize that students delight 
in seeing themselves, so we have made 
an effort to feature and identify as many 
students as possible. I will admit that many 
of the changes this yearbook has undergone 
has been in the best interest of the students. 
As a senior, I know the importance of this 
yearbook to my fellow classmates. Therefore, 
I have searched for opportunities in which we , 
could feature as many seniors as possible. ' 

We hope you will take a moment 
to look for your friends and yourself \ 

You will be amazed to see where our i 

photographers have caught you! 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 




Abbott, Taylor. 

Ackerman. Olivia 180 

Adams, Ryan 165 

Advani, Sana 100 

Al-Majali, Laith 174 

Aldndge, Drayton 1 16 

Alfaro, Fiona 101 

Allen, Jeff 137 

Allen, Stephanie 15 

Allenby, Brian 33, 92, 209 

Alnes, Jaqueline 149, 159 

Altizer, Carly 180 

Amorosso, Greg 165 

Andersen, Randall 155 

Anderson, Chelsea 180 

Anderson, James 180 

Anderson, Mallory 57 

Anderson, Meg 92 

Andersen, Randall 154 

Anderson. Will 88, 102 

Arboleda, Carlos 161 

Arcaro, Tom 77, 112 

Archie, Lisa 153 

Armour, Will 115 

Arnold, Brett 180 

Austin, Harry 155 

Austin, Jenny 63 

Austin, Kate 19, 20, 31. 69, 80. 94. 
116, 117. 174, 180,224 

Austin, Rodney 27, 137 

Averett, Karlee 180 

Avraham-Katz. Eden 27 




Babb, Heather 119 

Bachmann, Patrick 180 

Baer. Katie 27 

Bagglino, Brittney 90 

Balazs, Elizabeth 139 

Baker. Laura 190 

Banks, Kyle 56 

Banner. Rachel 159 

Barbee. Ashley 157 

Barber. Tim 96 

Barker. Mason 180 

Bamas, Ashley.. 50. 51.56. 84.96. 
119. 180 

Barnes, Alix 139 

Barrett. Vincent 180 

Barrow. Jessica 147 

Bartels. Annie 180 

Barth, Kellie 180, 185 

Bartholomew, Phil 155 

Bass. Samantha 57 



Batten. Jermile' 153 

Beal. Kenton 137 

Beckham, Lauren 180 

Beeler, Caitlin 149, 159 

Beeson. Chris 1 16. 1 17, 180 

Bennett, Alice 180 

Bennett. Bradford 180 

Berlin. Mark 145 

Berne. Briana 163 

Berry, Taylor 137 

Bertone. Rachel 15, 25, 35, 48, 

63,69. 71,81.90.93. 110, 115, 

129. 131,224 

Billings, Gavin 137 

Birdette, Terrance 1 5 1 

Black. Roger 16, 54, 129 

Blackwell. Jen 170 

Bland. Lamar 86 

Bock. Peter 208, 224 

Bodine. Ashley 180 

Bodine. Lisa 180 

Bonine. Amanda 180 

Bonney. Evan 89 

Bonney. Josh 151 

Boone. Shannon 180 

Boozer, Russell 180 

Bomhofen, Jennifer 180 

Bourquin. Hannah 180 

Bowen. Lauren 141 

Brain. Samantha 224 

Brainer. Laura.. 181. 198, 199. 224 

Brandner, Arayael 153 

Brant. Brandon 1 37 

Braun, Meghan 143 

Brebbia, John 165 

Bredahl, Lars 180 

Brenner, Emily 143 

Brentnup, Laura 25 

Bresnahan, Chris 165 

Brewer. Alexandra 181 

Bridgers. Ellis 181 

Bristol. Yakira 181 

Britt, Daniel 165 

Brooke. Andrea 143 

Brooks. Alison 57. 181 

Brown, Amanda 181 

Brown, Cyntra HI. 181 

Brown. Jay 137 

Brown, Karen 181 

Brown, Rebecca 1 13 

Browne, Dan 106 

Brownstein, Taylor 47 

Bryant. James 101. 181.200 

Burke. Martin 134. 181 

Bums, Jennifer 181 

Bums. Katy 149. 159 

Burzotta. Jessica 27 

Bush. Lee 52 

Butler. Travis 187 

Butterly. Nicholas 145 

Byrd. Brittany 56. 181 




Byrd. Rushaun 137 

Cadwallader. Katherine 74 

Caldwell, Lauren 44 

Calpin, Molly 143 

Caltado, Dana 159 

Calvert, Samantha 50 

Camp, Lance 137 

Campbell, Andre 137 

Campbell. Ashley 56 

Campbell. David 127 

Campbell. Kim 27 

Campbell. Matt 26 

Canavaggio, Denise.... 56. 105, 181 

Canipe, Seth 165 

Cantor, Max 70 

Capozzola, Mark 1 12 

Carey, Molly 151 

Carroll, James 145 

Carstens, Eric 137 

Carter, Christina 1 8 1 

Carter, Devan 151 

Cashion, Alex 10 

Cassano, Heather 35, 145, 161, 163 

Cassebaum, Anne 86 

Castine, Casey 181, 195 

Cavanaugh, Kelly 127 

Cavell, Hunter 181 

Cella, Laura 29 

Chabai, Paul 181 

Chaffee, Sarah 61, 181 

Chalke. Priscilla 27 

Chaparro, Luis 181 

Chase, Tory 56, 57 

Chieppor, Meagan 106 

Chipman, Chris 92 

Churchill, John 84 

Cieri, Rachel. 28, 50, 84, 176, 181, 
224 

Citty, Jonathan 33, 181 

Clang, Kevin 23, 33, 63 

Clark, Dylan 165 

Clark, Katelin 57, 127 

Clark. Kelly 181 

Clements. Kristen 45, 56 

Clemcnte, Noelle 56 

Cloak. Kourtney 57 

Cobb. Tammy 38 

Coffman. Alexandra 57, 177 

Cogswell. Susan 181 

ColHns, Clint 145 

Collins. Meaghan 149, 159 

Condon, Erica 1 1 

Confort. Caitlin 90 

Conner. Jonathan 137 

Conner, Mitch 165 

Connolly. James 139 

Constantine. Adam 151, 181 

Conti. Christine 63 

Copenhagen. Lauren 147 

Copenhaver. Michael 137 

Corby. Margeaux 215 

Cornell. Glen 149 

Cortes Mazuelas, Raquel 105 

Cosgrove. Shannon 143 

Costa, Allvson 149. 159 




Costello. Sarah 224 

Coster. Mariah 141 

Cotton. Urysla 153. 159, 181 

Cowdrick, Kara 56, 181 

Cowie, Lesley..,. 46, 50, 51, 57, 66, 
106, 174, 176, 181,224 

Craft, Philip 74 

Crane, Devin 193 

Creeden, Catherine 54 

Crewe. Ashlee 167, 170, 171 

Cunningham, Megan 182 

Cupero, Jennifer 26 

Cuthbertson, Ned 137 

Czerwinski, Elizabeth 182 

Danahy, Mary 182 

Daniel, Jordan 137 

Danieley, Dr. James Earl 10, 86, 87 

Danieley, Verona 86 

Daniel, Jordan 182 

Daniels. Sarah 139 

Darkes. Leah 16 

Darling, Thomas 161 

Damell, Jordan 165 

Darrell, Devin 182 

Davis, Anna 23, 33, 82 

Davis. Clarence 182 

Davis. Diana 157 

Davis, Evan 63 

Davis, Kelsey 182 

Davis, Michael 74 

Davis, Tiffany 153, 182 

Day. Erin 113 

Day, Veronica 159 

Deatsch, Ah 147 

Decker, Anna 141 

Decoteau, Shauna 97 

DeLong, Alex 49 

DelPizzo, Pam 167, 171 

Demere, Camille 50 

Denecke, Morgan 149, 159 

Depow, Lindsay 27, 45, 182 

DeRoberts, Marc 75 

Derreberry, Claire 51, 182, 224 

Deutschle. Megan 143 

DeVantier, Jamie Lee 54, 141 

Diemer, Andie 50, 77. 182 

DiLaura. Daniel 10, 

Dilger, Stephen 145 

Dillard, Reed 145 

DiLuzio, Daniel 16 

Dimuzio, Stefan 182 

Dinwiddie, Matt 46 

Dobyns, Jessica 45 

Dodge, Sarah 102 

Dodson, Jack 50 

Dodson, Mykel 182, 187 

Doe, Taylor 1 15 

Dolphin, James 115 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



Donald. Megan 154 

Donnelly. Kathleen 90 

Donoho. Elise 182 

Donovan. Elizabeth 182 

Doose. Victoria 50 

Dorado, Laura 199. 224 

Dorrow. Andrea 182 

Dotson, Rebecca 182 

Douglas. TJ 151. 182 

Draper, Ross 182 

Drayton. Kelly 1 1 7 

Dressel. Stephen 154, 155 

Duff. Michael 56 

DufTy. Jessica 1 1 1 

Dugas. Roger 151 

Durr. Elaine 66 

Duvall. Alan 182 




Eastman. Matt 137 

Echter. Brandon 182 

Eddy, Celia 147 

Edwards, Christina 98 

Elcock, .Allison 57 

Elliot, William 183 

Encamacion. .\lex 137 

EiTfin. Brett 151 

Esrock. Susan 26. 59 

Evans, Kelsey 153 

Evans. Tracey 76. 183 

Ezell. Kenneth 155 

Eversole. Lindsav 183 




Fadaam. Ahmed 112. 113 

Fakhar. Scarlett 143 

Falkenbury. Catherine 183 

Farrell. Kelly 26 

Fekete. Mike 155 

Feldman. Olivia 130. 131 

Fendt. Lindsay 1 1. 

13.30.50.54,63,88, 111. 129. 

147.209. 210. 211 

Fennessy. Steve 103 

Fernandez. Edward 1 14 

Ferrer. Ken 165 

Filazzola. Craig 176, 183 

Fine. Rachael 110. 111. 183 

Fitzgerald. Erin 1 10 

Fleet. Lauren Van 139 

Fleming, Morgan 145 

Fogle. Hilan- 139 

Foley. Shannon 143 

Folsom. Katrina 183 

Ford. Ah 153 




Foumier. Emily 149. 159 

Foushec. Sarah 45 

Fo.x. Carolme 81. 183 

Fox. Kevin 183 

Fraase. Laura 73 

Frame, Chelsea 183 

Frank, Nicole 183 

Franks, Brad 145 

Eraser, Niko 165 

Frederick. Jordan 50. 77 

Fredrickson. Lauren 149. 159 

Fry. Chris 79 

Funk. Laura 183 



Games. Lone 123 

Gant, Jarrod 1 37 

Garber. Tim 149 

Gardner. Drew 145 

Garrison. .Andrew 149 

Gaul Emily 183 

Gause, Tiara 153 

Gee. Frances 183 

Genszler. Kristin 141 

Gentile. Greg 102. 103 

Gentile. Nicholas 183 

Gerelus. Leanne 183 

Gianni, Justin 149 

Gibbons, Daniel 183 

Gibson, Dan 191 

Gibson, Jordan 137 

Gierlach. Erica 183 

Gill. Russell 84 

Gilman. Kelsey 183 

Gilmer. Renee 183 

Girdwood. Thomas 165 

Girvin, Alyssa 159 

Giunta. Stephanie 149, 159 

Glass. Daniel 80 

Glaze. Emily 13 

Glover. Kelsey 60. 61 

Goldman. Avery 42 

Goldsberry. Jake 1 37 

Goldstein, Josh 155 

Goltz, Dave 137 

Gonzalez. Jackie 167. 170. 171 

Goodson. Cynthia 184 

Gorsuch. James 116. 120. 183 

Gousse, Ranley 149 

Grable, Scott 151. 183 

Grady. Don 71 

Graham. Emerald.... 167. 170, 171 

Graybill, Laura 163 

Green. .Amanda 183 

Green, Meghan 157 

Greenbaum. Sarah 183 

Greene, Travis 1 37 

Gregg. Conner 183 

Griffith. Lauren 143 

Grimes. Philip 47 




Griswold. Christopher 56 

Groom. Corey. 119. 137. 141. 143. 
177. 188.224 

Gros. Hunter 183. 194 

Gros. Keagan 1 17 

Gunthcr. Ryan 165 

Gustat'son. Scott 94 

Gwilt. Kelsey 94 

Gwynn. David 102 

Gvllenhaal. Randall 184 



H 

Haime. Sandra 184 

Haines. Steven 184. 200 

Hairston. Lei Lei 153 

Hall. Geoff 43 

Hall. Joey 137 

Hallbcrg. Brittany 143 

Halm. Julie 92 

Hallovvay. Patrick 197 

Hamilton. Chnstina 52. 53. 96 

Haney. Kristen 143 

Hansen. Mary 184 

Harhaugh. Erin 184. 199. 224 

Hardin, Logan 137 

Hardison. Ronnie 137 

Harman. Brett 116 

Harman. Patrick 38 

Harmon, Jillian 184 

Harper, .Aiesha 153 

Harrel, Sara 184 

Harrington, Liz 92, 141 

Harris, A. J 137 

Harris, Chris 137 

Harris, Frank 86 

Harris, Walker 42 

Harrison, David 137, 184 

Hawkesworth, Lauren 159 

Hawkey, Andrew 149 

Hawthorne. Roberta 184 

Heilman. Nikki 143 

Heinicke. A\\\ 143 

Helms, Amelia 184 

Helpingstine. Chase 161 

Helton. Brandon 106. 184 

Henderson. Zach 137 

Hennon. James 184 

Hensley. .Alexandra 184. 190 

Herbert. Kyle 137 

Herrmann. Melanie 184 

Hezar. Anthony 165 

Hicken. Kayla 1.38 

Hicks. Stephanie 139. 184 

Higbee. Erik 25 

Hilgartner, Kristin 184 

Hill. Camille 167. 171 

Hill. Catherine 1 84 

Hilt. Justin 165 

Hindle. Sarah 184 

Hinote. Justin 1 15 



Hinson. Matt 165 

Hitch. David 184 

Hockemeyer. Scott 155 

HolTer. Mark 137 

Hojnacki. .Alexandra 141 

Homsy. Chris 137 

Hopkins. Kate 26 

Hosseini. Khaled 77 

Hovalter. Kallie 153 

Howell. Christine 184 

Howell. Clark 161 

lloyt. Michael 184 

Huang. Monica 1 12 

Hubert-Allen. Olivia 94 

Hudgins. Terrell... 26. 27. 137. 183 

Huggins. Benjamin 184 

Hughes. Cara 159 

Hughes. Mollie 141 

Hulett. Anna 25 

Hunsucker. Anna 1 1 7 

Hunt. David 137 

Hunter. Mollie 137 

Husack. Matthew 193 

Hydrick. Alison 184 



I 




Ibarra. Sofia 101 

Imeni. Erfan 145 

lorio. Grace 184 

Irwin. Clint 1 45 

Isaac. Carmen 1 84 

Isaacson. Sarah 42 

Izzo, Antonio 67 



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Jackson. Garrett 101 

Jacobs. Julia 184 

Jacobsen, Kristi 37 

James, Carl 197 

James. David 54 

James. Will 26 

Jarret. Chris 100 

Jeffcoat. Sean 137 

Jenkins, George 184 

Jessup, Cam 185 

Johnson, AUison 147 

Johnson, Clay 137 

Johnson, Eden 27, 185 

Johnson, Kelsey 157 

Johnson. Kyle 185 

Johnson. Melanie 27, 45, 185 

Johnston, Curtis 1 85 

Jones, Amanda 143 

Jones, Jordan 1 37 

Jones, Joshua 1 37 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 




Jones, Kaya 185 

Jones. Nathaniel 185 

Jones, Stuart 29, 224 

Jordan, Melissa 61 

Jorgensen-Graham, Eva 185 

Judy, Jayson 155 



Kahane, Sam 10 

Kansky, Melissa 131 

Kaplan, Adam 109 

Karpeh, Archi 145 

Katz, Julianne 108 

Kaufman, Ben 1 14 

Kay, David 185, 200 

Kean, Emmy 178 

Keddy. Kaitlin 1 78 

Keiser, Kristy 57. 178 

Keller, Andrea 143 

Kennedy, Amanda 129 

Kennedy, Bobby 165 

Kennedy, Jennifer.... 141, 177, 185 

Kenney, Lauren 93 

Kennison, Amanda 50, 185 

Kensrue, Paige 163 

Kerman, David 1 16 

Kemodle, Jared 165 

Kestermann, Andy 42 

Keto. Erica 153 

Kim, William 16 

Kimble, Lindsay 50, 102 

King, Alyssa 126, 224 

King, Austen 145 

King, Samantha 50 

Kinney, Steven 145 

Kjrby, Denny 137 

Kirchner Matt 165 

Klara, Carolina 143 

Kling, Caroline 185 

Kloppers, Daleen 163 

Klug, Kristen 185, 199 

Koehn. Jaclyn 57. 185 

Koontz, David 50 

Koster. Mariah 177 

Krause, Sydnie 131 

Kristof Nicholas 84, 85 

Kromer, Mileah 106 



l*** 



L 

Labmowicz, Andre 137 

Lafferty, Danielle 167, 171 

Lambert, Leo ... 1,3,6,66,83, 174 

Lamikanra, Olufemi 137 

Lampley, Leigh 8 1 

Landy, Maggie 42 



Lane, Hannah 20 

Lane, Mallory 141 

Lane, Stephanie 1 15 

LaRussa, Jacquehne 185 

Latique, Gabe 145 

Lawrence, Alexandra 13 

Lawrie, Bess 25 

Lazor. Katie 63, 92 

Lea. Peyton 70. 176 

Lebak. Lauren 157 

LeBeau. Kristen 185 

LeBlanc. Danielle 141 

Ledbetter. Carly 147 

Leddy, Matt 137 

Lee, Brittany 185 

Lee, Jordan 159 

Lefner. Andy 137 

Lemke, Caroline 147 

Leonard. Samantha 185 

Lesko, John 185 

Levent, AlHson 27, 139 

Levy, Jenna 45 

Lewald. Danielle 45 

Lewis, Dannika 57, 176 

Lewis, Heidi 185 

Lewis, Jerome 178, 185 

Light, .lay 54 

Lightfoot, Quinton 137 

Lind. Brad 137 

Lindsey. Taylor 42 

Litoff. Alex 47, 147 

Little. Morgan 50, 185 

Little, Sydney 143 

Llewellyn, Tracy 1 85 

Lockamy, Marcus 185 

Locke, Amanda 139 

Long, Chris 151 

Lothes, Natalie 185 

Lovelace, Angle 81 

Lovell, Kevin 185 

Lovett, Lucas 60 

Luberoff, Nancy 131 

Lubling, Yoram 187 

Lucas, Avery 21, 27, 33, 50, 79, 98, 
101, 102, 105, 117,224 

Ludwig, Eric 137, 185 

Lueck, Kristen 139 

Luedtke, Jess 153 

Lunka. Ben 145 

Luther, Caleb 155 

Lutz, Melanie 139, 185 

Luxenburg, Alex 155 

Lynn, John 186, 197 

Lyons, Conley 57, 186 



M 



-i3 



Maccou. Manuel 186 

MacDaniels, Tara 186, 196 

MacDougall, Carly 167. 171 

MacHaffie. Brad 165 



Mader. Greg 145 

Magida, David 42, 130, 131 

Mahoney, James 155 

Malha, Christine 186 

Manship. Kevin 186 

March. Andrea 159 

Margolis, Jessica 163 

Marin, Erick 61, 100, 101, 104, 

105, 186 

Markham, Stacey 49 

Markowitz. Courtney 108 

Martens, Laura 159 

Martin, Amelia 186 

Martin, Clara 159 

Martin, Lindsay 186 

Martin, Luke 137 

Martin, Taylor 13 

Martyn, Sean 149 

Maruri, Alex 165 

Mas, Courtney 1 86 

Mason, Ginna Claire 109 

Massa, Nicholas 186 

Mastropolo. Melissa 186 

Matera, Kathy 67 

Matthews, Carohne 50 

Mature, Maria 143 

Maxham, Jill 186 

Mayer, Virginia 157 

Mazzarini, Kathryn 186 

McBride, Richard 21 

McCabe, Patrick 56 

McCain, Noell 143 

McClain, Dave 137 

McCoury, Grant 165 

McCullough, Mica 76. 186 

McDonald, Kristen 186 

McEvoy. Kelsey 186 

McFadden. Tara 157 

McGinnis. Chelsey 139 

McGlenn, Cameron 137, 186 

McGowan. Caitlin.... 167. 170. 171 

McGowan, Devon 10 

McGowan, Molly 17 

McGrath, Kristi 45. 1 86 

McGraw, Ashley 92 

McGreevy. John 210 

Mcintosh. Liza 139 

McKenna, Sarah 149, 159 

McKinley. Carohne 143 

McKinley. Makaila 186 

McLendon, Pat 116, 134 

McMahon. Megan 147 

McMicken, Andrew 137 

McNabb, Amy 1 1 7 

McNair, Jenna 78 

McNeela, Cathy 109 

McNeil, Janelle 159 

McQueen, Darrius 137 

McQuilkin, Brett 137 

Meacham, Eleanor 80 

Meares. Ashley 187 

Medley. Courtney 153 

Melendez, Catherine 26, 174 

Melillo, Mike 165 

Mellette, Aaron 137 



Menzel, Blair... 30, 41. 45, 59, 109, 
119, 224 

Mercurio, Connor 149 

Meyer, David 151 

Meyer, Katie 56 

Midgett, Sara 187 

Milam, Jessica 187 

Milan, Alexa 84, 187 

Milder, Tristan 131, 187 

Militello, Stephanie 52. 53 

Milkins, May 188 

Miller, Dan 173, 187 

Miller, Hunter 145 

Miller, Samantha 187 

Miller, Stephen 145 

Millian, Anna 163 

Minnock, Patrick 187 

Mirek, Paul 187,201 

Moir, Chelsea 187 

Mohn, Lindsay 25 

Molina, Jose 100, 104, 105, 187 

Molloy, Elizabeth 27, 57, 195 

Molzon, Katherine 187 

Montgomery, Sara 188 

Moody, John 151 

Mooney, Emily 1 15 

Morillo, Nicole 60 

Morris, Morgan 187 

Morris, Shane 56 

Morrison, Cory 74 

Moss, Alexis 187 

Mover, Crystal 27, 139 

Mullen, Tom 94 

Mullin. Dani 157 

Mullins, Khiry 137 

Muntean, Angela 63 

Murphy, Michelle .... 141, 177, 187 
Myers, Ashley 167, 171 



N 



VCP^ 



Nachajski, Michael 92 

Needell, Lauren... 9, 10, 16, 18, 51, 
126, 127,224 

Neidhardt, Emily 131 

Nemec. Philip 161 

Neuhauser, Jordan 145 

Newcomer, Shay 137 

Newsome, Brandon 137 

Nguyen, My 33,63, 187 

Nogi, Ally 147 

Norell, Allison 26 

Norkett, Kelsey 27, 139 

Northcut, Shea 124, 125 

Norton, Tanner 155 

Norwind, Laura 143, 187 

Nowak, Mike 92 

Nusdeo, Lindsey 143 

Nwoko, Chinwe 23, 33, 82, 187 



220 WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 




O Brien. Conor 

O Brien. Jamie 

O'Connell, Bethany 

O'Connor. Elizabeth 

O'Dunne. Katelyn 149. 

O'Hagan. Joe 

O'Keefe. Claire 

O'Neal, Alexandra 

O'Neal. Crista 

O'Rourke. Luke 

O'Shea. Corey 

O'Shea. Erin 167, 170, 

Ogolo. Jon 

Ogunyase. Denzel 

Olive-Taylor. Rebecca 122. 

Oloye. Gabby 

Orsi. Craig 135, 

Osborne. Matthew 

OserolT. Jennifer 44. 

Ostazeski. Kelly 

Ott.Chat 

Owens. Wilson 23, 

Pace. Jim 



149 

117 
185 
187 
159 
165 
143 
187 
118 
.92 
137 
171 
151 
145 
123 
153 
188 
188 
188 
188 
145 
188 




Pacewicz. Chnstine 149. 159 

Palmer. Elizabeth 57, 143 

Parkes. Sullivan 149. 159 

Parshall. Kelly 77 

PasquinelH. Sara 56. 188 

Passannante. Liz 1 14 

Patrick. Michael 52 

Patton. Lina 90, 91 

Penn. Virginia 42 

Peraza. Kathryn 188 

Perdue. Lindsay 30, 31, 117 

Perlman. Rachel 188 

Pern. Keith 188 

Per%ell. Kari 167. 171 

Peters. Keadrick 60, 188 

Peterson. Christina 188 

Peterson. Dawn 125 

Peterson. Jeremy 137 

Peterson. Justin 63 

Petrash. Kenan 188, 209 

PiazzoUa. Kaitlyn 167. 170. 171 

Pickler. Casey 43 

Piland. Randy... 16. 49, 50, 59, 61, 
74. 224 

Pitman. Chase 29 

Pompliano. 'Vincent 137 

Pons. Phihp 188 

Poole. Mariana 188 

Ponnoff. Elizabeth 188 

Powers, Orry 145 

iPritchard. Neal 165 



Pre\ost. Darius 188 

Prilutski. Megan 188 

Provost. Melissa 149, 159 

Prunty. Shannon 157 

Pullan. .Ashley 188 

Pullen, Michelle 143 

PurceU, Jill 57 

Purgason II, Joe 188 

Pusateri. Tonv 145 




Quinn. Stephanie 141 




Ramer. Susan 188 

Ramsdell. Lauren 1 12 

Rawlings. Nichole 189. 192 

Reaves. Kevin 189. 196 

Reece, John 137 

Reeder. Douglas 189 

Regan. Emily 147 

Rehbein. Mark 137 

Reichenback. J.D 165 

Remein, Abigail 1 89 

Reno, Jay 174, 176, 189 

Reuschling, Eric 189 

Reyer. Melanie 149. 159 

Reyes. Carly 135 

Reyes. Jimmy 165 

Reynolds. Emily 27 

Rice. Amanda 159 

Richards, Clark 137 

Richardson, .Alisha 44, 189 

Richardson. Elliott 137 

Richardson. Matthew 149 

Richie. Stuart 189 

Richter. Pam 50 

Rickershauser, Dan 50, 116 

Riddle. Scott 26,27, 137, 165 

Riggs. Kristen 189 

Riley. Dale 137 

Riley. Lila 74 

Roberts. Beth 94 

Roberts. Julia 189 

Roberts. Katie 199 

Robertson. Elizabeth 189 

Robertson. Justine 159 

Robins. Miller 155 

Robinson. Mary 189 

Rohrbom. Samantha 32 

Rojas. .Mberto 161 

Rojas. Maria 74 

Romer, Jane 86 

Rorie. Rsaun 137 

Resell. Bruce 137 



Rosen. Ian 1 19 

Rossbach. Jenny 139 

Rossi. Catherine 149. 159 

Rounds, Danielle 189 

Rubertonc. John 137 

Rucker. Sian 90. 91 

Rum. Gina 189, 196 

Rusch. 'Will 113 

Russell. Libby 94, 174 

Russo. Madison 159 

Ryan. Rich 60, 174, 187 

Ryan. Roxanne 189 

Rvmer. Elizabeth 27 



s 




Sachs, Katelynn 189 

Saint. .Arie 174 

Salek. Amy 159 

Sankey. Clay 149 

Sanner, Emily 57 

Sawyer, Tony 120, 121 

Scalici, Caroline 139 

Schefer. Will 149 

Schemerhom. Sarah 147 

Schmit. Edward 109 

Schoenholtz. Jessica 13. 55. 57, 224 

Schmit. Edward 109 

Schneider. Megan 56, 189 

Schroth. .Andrew 57 

Schulenid, Justine 15. 149. 159 

Schulz, Kristin 189 

Schwayze 32 

Scott. Ben 165 

Scott. Jake 42 

Scuilietti. Brett 189 

Seabolt. Erik 189 

Seeler. Harrison 190 

Seltman. Courtney 143 

Serow. Brian 127 

Sessoms. Lauren 163 

Shafto. Chris 137 

Shandwick. Weber 103 

Sharp. Lauren 26 

Shelton. Hannah 167. 171 

Sherry. Michael 178, 190 

Shipowitz, Jennifer 141 

Shoffner. Lionel 137 

Shreiner. .Adam 137 

Shreiner. .Alex 1 15 

Shulder. Rachel 88 

Shuman. Jamal 137 

Shute, Travis 190 

Siegel. Catherine 141, 177, 190 

Siegel. Jane.. 65, 84, 87, 89, 96, 99, 
121, 122, 123,224 

Silva. Emily 95. 190 

Silva. Enn 190 

Silva. Kirsten 190 

Silverstein. Debra 193 

Silvcstri, Kristine 57 



Simermeyer, Jessica 12 

Simmonds. Amy 37 

Simonetti. Elisa 163 

Simonetli. Kristin 171 

Skogen. Sarah 159 

Slobodien, Rob 101 

Slocum. Joe 63 

Small. Evan 57 

Smith. Aaron 151 

Smith. Cecilia 37 

Smith. Julia 129 

Smith. Laura.. 45, 50, 84, 176. 190 

Smith. Phil 178 

Smith. Sunny 190 

Somers. John 155 

Somerville. Elizabeth 190 

Sonzogni. Chris 47 

Southard. Enn 190 

Southmayd. Rachel 191 

Spalding. Chris 100 

Sparks. Brandy 190 

Sparrow, Angela 45 

Speer. Emily 57, 190 

Speir. Alyssa 190 

Spitz. Dana 79 

Sposato. Charles 190 

Spotts. Margaret 90 

Spradlin. Drew 151 

Springer. Drake 190 

Spuriock, Brandon 137 

St. Cyr. Mark 190 

Stafford. Sadie 141 

Stanchi. Emily 90 

Stancil. Amanda 26 

Staskel. Chris 189 

Statler. Jennifer 56 

Stauffer-MacDowell, Cody 161 

Stegemann. Chris 155 

Stellard. Johnny 109 

Sterling. Rachel 139 

Stevenson. Brian 27. 1 39 

Stevenson, Erin 56 

Stewart, Traci 147 

Stirland. Connor 1 16 

Stoddard, Jo Beth 129 

Stokes. Camilla 190 

Stokes. Jim 165 

Stone. Lindsay 190 

Strange. Jennine 159 

Stratton-Brook, EUie 79, 90 

Straus. .Andrew 137 

Street. Daniel 145 

Strucko. Jenna 139 

Sturm. .Andrew 190 

Sullivan. Karlos 137 

Sullivan, Sean 137 

Sun, Justin 190 

Swanner. Savannah 40, 41 

Sweeney. Jonathan 92 

Sweeney. Ryan 190 

Sweet. Jenny 74 

Swett, Kevin 82, 191 

Swim, Alex 165 

Swords, Emily 26 

Szewcow. Gabriela 50. 224 



WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



m-'yi^ 




T 

Tabor, Katie 190 

Talbott, Sarah 93 

Tate, Joshua 116, 190,216 

Taylor, Cassie 131 

Taylor, Dontay 137 

Taylor, Ian 177 

Taylor, Julie 153 

Taylor, Lauren 56 

Taylor, Lauren 167, 170, 171 

Taylor, Thonda 137 

Temple, Jenna 25, 190 

Templeton, Carlyn 190 

Terry, Alexa 115, 190 

Theard. HoUis 190 

Thelin, Linda 191 

Thierer, Catherine 191 

Thomas, Chris 145 

Thomas, Hampton 43, 139 

Thomas, Zach 10 

Thomka, Lindsey 157 

Thompson, Andrew 191 

Thompson, Blake 137 

Thompson, Jared 1 37 

Thompson, Kelsey 141 

Thompson, Stephen 47 

Thompson, Tony 1 37 

Threeths, Jahan 145 

Thurm, Jeffrey 191, 198, 199 

Tonkins, Nagatha 96 

Trice, Alex 19, 50 

TrilHng, Grace 191 

Troianello, KeUy 27 

Trout, Corey 191 

Tryon, Emily 149, 159 

Turner, Drew 137 

Turner, Eric 161 

Turner, Helen 26 





Turowski, Melissa 159 

V^ 

Van Fleet, Lauren 139 

vanRoden, Eleni 191 

Vamer, Russell 134 

Veilleux, Carolyn 157 

Vermissen, Iris 191, 192 

Vines, Monique 191 

Vogt, Kate 92 

Vontress, Geena 1 59 

w 

Wade. Allison 139 

Waggoner, Kyle 143 

Wagner, Dennis 137 

Wagner, Lindsay 216 

Wahl, Hayley 163, 191 

Wainman, Laura 191 

Walker, Brittany 60 

Walker, Kevin 114 

Walker, Khirey 137 

Walker, Kim. 83,84, 174, 177. 179 

Wall, Amber 153 

Wallace, Morgan 143 

Walters, Lucas 149 

Walton, Adam 63 

Wanner, Megan 133, 224 

Ward, Brandon 137 

Ward, Jennifer 224 

Ward, Justin 137 

Ward, Merrill 117, 129 

Ward, Nolan 137, 191 



Warr, Lauren 52, 53 

Warren, Sam 149 

Watson, Toraeka 167, 170, 171 

Watts, Daniel 151 

Watts, John 137 

Weathers, Courtney 159 

Webb, Kyle 165 

Weber, Jeremy 191 

Weller, Paul 37 

Wells, David.... 27, 28, 50, 78, 109, 

139, 141, 143, 149, 151,224 

Wells, Sara 176 

Werden, Chris 137 

West, Lizzie 147 

West, Nick 42 

Wetherbee, Rebecca 50, 81 

Whalen, Courtney 149 

Whaley, Jasmine 139 

Whaley, Matthew 197 

Whanger, Josh. 173, 181, 183, 185, 

191, 199,224 

White, Kimberly 47 

White, Walker 137, 191 

Whittington, Gerald 82 

Wieand, Christine 191 

Wiggins, Brandon 137 

Wilkins, Brittany 159 

Williams, David 137 

Williams, Hannah 177 

Williams, Jerried 191 

Williams, Kristin 191 

Wilhams, Leon 61 

Williamson, Cameron 30, 31 

Williamson, Matt 137 

WiUiamson, Miriam... 50, 191, 224 

Wilmer, Lauren 159 

Wilson, Mandy 147 

Wilson, Terrell 137 

Wilson, Thomas 137 

Wimberly, Lyllian 191 

Winklevoss, Clay 26, 94 



Winsper, Alanna 143 

Wise, Katherine 88 

Wisniewski, Lauren 96, 191 

Wood, Craig 155 

Wood, David 165 

Woody, Sarah 191 

Woodward, Taylor 92 

Wrenn, Kristen 52, 224 

Wright, Jacqueline 191 

Wright, Morgan 167, 171 

Wyatt, Justin 145 

Wynn, Courtney 191 



Y 






Yaffe, Eva 130, 131 

Yancey, Bennett 191 

Yantosh, Monica 27 

Yardenay, Ron 59, 131 

Yarwood, Kirsten 134, 182, 191 

Yaussy, Elise 191, 200 

Yost, Mary 38 

Young, Fred 86 

Yuschak, Caitlyn 27 



Z 



4i^ 



Zale, Renee 210 

ZeiHnger, Rachel 42, 79 

Zidar, MeUssa 147 

Zoda, Tyler 137 

Zorski, Taylor 149 

Zmozynski, Allison . 205, 207, 212, 
214,224 




WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 



x.^.^.^..^. m 



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WORK HARD, PLAY HARD 223 



Yearbook Staff 20 10 



Editor in Chief 

Lesley Cowie 

Life Section Editor 

Lauren Needell 

Academics Section Editor 

Jane Siegel 

Sports Section Editor 

Megan Wanner 

Seniors Section Editor 

Josh Whanger 



News Section Editors 

Peter Bock 
Allison Zmozynski 

Index Section Editor 

Samantha Brain 

Design Editors 

Rachel Cieri 
Erin Harbaugh 

Advertising Managers 

Laura Brainer 
Claire Derreberry 



Photography Editor 

Kate Austin 

Multimedia Editor 

Sarah Costello 

Staff Advertising 

Laura Dorado 

Staff Designers 

Alyssa King 
Gabriela Szewcow 
Kristen Wrenn 



Staff Photographers 

Corey Groom 
Stuart Jones 
David Wells 

Staff Writers 

Rachel Bertone 
Avery Lucas 
Blair Menzel 
Jessica Schoenholtz 




Colophon 



The 95th edition of Phi Psi Cli yearbook was produced by the 
2010 Phi Psi Cli staff at Elon University in Elon, North Carolina. 
Taylor Publishing of Dallas, Texas, printed 1,000 copies of the 
224-page all-color book. The account was serviced by Milani Arguelles 
and customer service adviser Brian Hunter. Free copies of the yearbook 
were distributed to students, faculty and staff and sent home to class of 
2010 graduates, at their request. 

Senior Jennifer Ward developed the theme "Work Hard, Play Hard" 
in May 2009 at the eighth annual National College Yearbook Workshop 
in New Orleans, La. This theme developed as a result of a brainstorming 
discussion in which five Phi Psi Cli staff members came up with words 
and phrases that described the average Elon University student. Due 
to students' dedication to service, engaged learning and study abroad, 
these students decided that the average Elon University student knows 
how to work hard and how to play hard. Although this phrase defines 
the average Elon University student. Phi Psi Cli staff members also put 
forth extra effort to continue this theme of contrast, as illustrated in 
various design elements throughout the book. 

Rachel Cieri, Erin Harbaugh, Gabriela Szewcow, Alyssa King and 
Sarah Costello designed six cover samples. In March, senior-level 
students across campus voted for the cover design they liked best. 
The cover is process color printing on lithicote material with matte 
lamination and UV varnish application. The binders board is 160 
pt. The endsheets are made out of rainbow parchment. All pages are 
printed on 100-pound paoer. 

The 2010 edition covers from August 2009 to May 2010. The book 
was created using Adobe InDesign CS4 on four Macintosh computers 



in the Priestley Building, where the Phi Psi Cli office is located. Senior 
Erin Harbaugh developed the style guide for the book. All body copy 
was set in 10-point Minion Pro. Captions were set in 9-point Gill 
Sans Bold. All page headlines were done in Gill Sans Ultra Bold, with 
subheads in Gill Sans Light. Pages were submitted to the plant online. 

Each section in the book has been indicated by the use of a colored 
strip at the bottom of the page. These colors make up the color palette 
for the 2010 book. The colors were used to indicate the following 
sections: life, academics, sports, seniors, news and the index. 

Lifetouch Studios of Burlington, NC, photographed senior students 
in their caps and gowns on designated photo days throughout the year. 
Pictures on all pages were either submitted by students or photographed 
by a member of the Phi Psi Cli staff. 

The staff of Phi Psi Cli would like to thank all those who made this 
book possible, including, but not limited to: all students who submitted 
pictures and stories, the Media Board for their guidance, Lucas Lovett 
for designing the new Phi Psi Cli Web site and our adviser, Randy 
Piland, for his continued support and advice. Finally, I would like to 
thank our Taylor representative, Brian Hunter, for being a mentor, 
adviser and great friend. He believes in what he does and brings joy and 
enthusiasm to many high school and college yearbooks. Thank you for 
all your help. 

Phi Psi Cli was featured in the 2010 YearbookYearbook and received 
four honors from the North Carolina College Media Association, 
including Best in Show Yearbook, 2nd Place for section divider design 
and Honorable Mention titles for photography and student life copy. 






1